Best Way To Save Wildlife Babies Leave Them Alone

first_img“Newborn moose calves aren’t able to run from pets or people on bicycles,” Battle said. “Mothers are likely to stand their ground, even when they hear you coming.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is reminding residents of one important thing, a newborn animal found alone in the woods – or even in your backyard – can appear helpless and abandoned. But don’t be fooled. Destitute as those big-eyed babies may seem, a protective mother is almost always nearby. If a moose calf or bear cub is encountered without its mother immediately in view, be alert in case you’ve walked between them. The best course of action is usually to back away and leave from the direction you came. Also, do not assume young animals found alone are orphaned. Mother moose and bears frequently walk out of sight, cache their young, or become separated from them by fences or roads. Sow bears often send cubs up trees to wait before leaving to find food. In nearly all cases, the mothers return to their young. Bicyclists and runners should be especially alert as they can swiftly top hills or round corners and run into moose, bears and other wildlife. Making noise to alert wildlife to your presence is always a good precaution, but may not be enough to avoid clashes with moose cows with calves. Wildlife Biologist Dave Battle says attacks on people and pets by cows aggressively defending calves are reported each spring: “You’ll want to give moose calves plenty of space.” If you observe a young animal that appears to have been left alone for more than 48 hours, contact the nearest Alaska Department of Fish and Game office during regular business hours, or use the department’s smartphone-friendly link to file a report online by visiting http://www.adfg.alaska.gov and clicking the “Report a Wildlife Encounter” button.last_img

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