Cutest Disney Bag Ever

first_imgPhotos: Christina HarrisonIs this bag on your must-buy list? Let us know in the comments. Share This!Like Julia, I’m a big fan of the Disney-themed accessories from Loungefly. They’re less expensive that the Dooney & Bourke bags and more weather resistant than many of the Vera Bradley bags.This new Loungefly pattern that’s shown up in the parks and on shopDisney.com is an instant classic. We found ours in the jewelry shop on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom, but they should be available in many locations.It’s like they cutified all the best Disney icons (Dole Whip, turkey legs, Mickey & Minnie, balloons, it’s a small world, Space Mountain, Dumbo, Big Al!, and more) and then placed them on the most lovely field of teal.The pattern is available in a backpack style ($75) or as a wallet ($50). Both are lined in a darling teal and white stripe.last_img read more

Why South Africa’s Karoo is a palaeontological wonderland

first_imgSouth Africa’s Karoo region provides not only a historical record of biological change over a period of Earth’s history but also a means to test theories of evolutionary processes over long stretches of time.A typical landscape in the Karoo semi-desert region of South Africa. (Image: Media Club South Africa)• Newly found ape-man lived alongside Lucy, 3 million years ago• South African scientists track the sun’s storms• Cape bones add new chapter to human history • Bloggers take a trip back to humanity’s origins • South African research funding fourth-highest in the worldBruce Rubidge and Mike Day, University of the WitwatersrandSouth Africa’s Karoo region has been in the headlines in recent years because of the prospect of a controversial fracking programme to exploit its potential shale gas resources. But, to palaeontologists, the Karoo Supergroup’s rocks hold the key to understanding the early evolutionary history of the major groups of land vertebrates – including tortoises, mammals and dinosaurs.More than 200-million years ago, South Africa formed part of the southern hinterland of Pangaea, the great single supercontinent, which was inhabited by a diverse flora and fauna.In only a few places, where conditions were conducive to their fossilisation, can palaeontologists catch a glimpse of these ancient ecosystems. The Karoo is one such place.A representation of the ancient supercontinent of Pangaea, showing modern country borders. Some 200-million years ago, South Africa formed part of of the southern hinterland of this great continent. Click image for a larger view. (Image: Massimo Pietrobon) Why it’s such a special placeAbout 265-million years ago, the Beaufort Group of rocks within the Karoo sequence was beginning to be deposited by rivers draining into the shrinking inland Ecca Sea. As these rivers filled the basin with sediment they entombed the remains of land animals that lived around them. The youngest Beaufort rocks are around 240-million years old.Today, more than 30 000 fossils of vertebrate animals from the Beaufort are to be found in museum collections across the world. The Beaufort was followed by the Molteno and Elliot formations. The Elliot formation is made up of a succession of red rocks that records some of the earliest dinosaur communities.The area plays a crucial role in revealing the distant origin of mammals, tortoises and dinosaurs. It also covers two great extinction events, the end-Permian (252-million years ago) and the end-Triassic (200-million years ago).Because of its continuity of deposition, the Karoo provides not only a historical record of biological change over this period of Earth’s history, but also a means to test theories of evolutionary processes over long periods of time.Map showing the formations of the Karoo Supergroup. Click image for a larger view.The 400 000-square-kilometre area is internationally noted for its record of fossil therapsid “mammal-like” reptiles. These chart anatomical changes on the path to mammals from their early tetrapod forebears.The Beaufort Group has also yielded the oldest recorded fossil ancestor of living turtles and tortoises – the small, lizard-like Eunotosaurus. The younger Elliot Formation preserves a record of early dinosaurs that could help palaeontologists understand the rise of the giant sauropod dinosaurs of the Jurassic Period.Physiology and behaviourMany studies are still being done on the identification of new species from the Karoo. But a lot of current research is also focused on the relationship between the extinct animals and their environments.The story of the therapsid’s burrow is a good example of how insights are being gained on the behaviour of prehistoric animals. Roger Smith was the first palaeontologist to recognise therapsid vertebrate burrows in the Karoo. He described helical burrows, which he attributed to a small species of dicynodont (two-dog tooth) therapsid called Diictodon. In the fossil record, burrows are preserved not as hollows, but as the plug of sediment that filled them.X-ray tomography at a facility in France was recently used to scan one of these burrows. This showed that it was home not only to its maker – the meerkat-sized therapsid Thrinaxodon – but also to the early amphibian Broomistega. Further research revealed that the Thrinaxodon was probably hibernating, which was why it tolerated the intruding amphibian which was using the burrow to convalesce while suffering from broken ribs.Partners forever, the amphibian Broomistega and mammal fore-runner Thrinaxodon preserved in a fossil burrow. Click image for a larger view.Studying how fossil bones are preserved – a discipline known as taphonomy – can provide similarly rich insights. For example, it has been suggested that changes in preservation style between skeletons in the latest Permian Period (about 253-million years ago) to those in the earliest Triassic Period (about 252-million years ago) can be attributed to changes in climate. The region developed from being seasonally dry floodplains with high water tables to predominantly dry floodplains.Because of the abundance of fossil tetrapods in the rocks of the Karoo Supergroup, they have been used to divide the rock succession into fossil zones, called biozones. This has enabled the biozones to be correlated with equivalent sequences elsewhere in the world and forms the basis of reconstructing global patterns of diversity.Understanding the sequence of events is crucial for testing hypotheses of evolutionary processes. It is an area of research being pursued for both the Permian and Triassic periods.The big wipe-outsThe end-Permian mass extinction, the greatest, was responsible for the elimination of 90% of species living in the sea and 70% of species living on land. Roger Smith’s work on Karoo fossil vertebrates shows this extinction to have lasted some 300 000 years, terminating at the Permian-Triassic boundary 252-million years ago. It was followed by a lesser extinction pulse approximately 160 000 years later in the Early Triassic.Our current work is focusing on the more obscure Guadalupian extinction which occurred 8-million to 10-million years before the end-Permian. This is recognised from marine sequences. For the first, time empirical evidence for this event on land is being discovered from the Karoo fossil record.What’s next?These are exciting times for palaeontologists. Technological and scientific developments have opened up new vistas for their work.A comprehensive database of all the Karoo fossil vertebrate collections in South Africa has been built. This is the first database of Permian-Jurassic continental vertebrates. It is available to scientists globally, an invaluable tool for biogeographic and biostratigraphic studies.Better dating techniques are opening up the possibility of working out rates of evolution in fossil tetrapod lineages. High-resolution scanning techniques are also enabling palaeoscientists to explore areas which were previously inaccessible, or at least not without damaging the fossils.There are a myriad questions that remain unanswered. Were the early mammal ancestors of the Karoo warm-blooded? What can the Karoo tell us about the reaction of terrestrial ecosystems to mass extinction events? How can the Karoo’s shifting ecological make-up shine a light on evolutionary tempo? These are questions we can now attempt to answer.Bruce Rubidge is Director, Centre of Excellence in Palaeosciences at University of the Witwatersrand.Mike Day is Postdoctoral Fellow at Organisational Unit:Evolutionary Studies Institute at University of the Witwatersrand.This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.last_img read more

Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews

first_img Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press By David MalakoffJul. 31, 2018 , 6:20 PM The long wait for a White House science adviser is over. President Donald Trump announced today that he intends to nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier, a university administrator and former vice-chair of the governing board of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), to be director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The OSTP director traditionally, but not always, also holds the title of the president’s science adviser.The move caps a search process of record-setting length—nearly 560 days, double the longest time taken by any other modern president to name an OSTP director. Many in the research community had lamented the delay. But the wait may have been worth it: Droegemeier, a respected veteran of the Washington, D.C., policymaking scene, is getting positive reviews from science and university groups.“He’s a very good pick. … He has experience speaking science to power,” says environmental policy expert John Holdren, who served as science adviser under former President Barack Obama and is now at Harvard University. “I expect he’ll be energetic in defending the R&D budget and climate change research in particular.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img Kelvin Droegemeier Maria Zuber, a planetary geophysicist and vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agrees that Droegemeier will stand up for climate science. “He always has. I see no reason why he wouldn’t now.” But she says his style is not confrontational. “He’s a good old boy. He wears cowboy boots. … He’s a personable guy.” She adds that “he’s got solid conservative credentials,” noting that his web page is emblazoned with “God Bless America!!!”“He is an excellent choice,” says Tobin Smith, vice president for policy at the Association of American Universities in Washington, D.C. “He has a strong understanding of issues of concern to research universities.”“Kelvin is a solid scientist, excellent with people, and with deep experience with large bureaucracies,” says Cliff Mass, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “A moderate voice that won’t politicize the science.”Droegemeier, who has served on the faculty of The University of Oklahoma (OU) in Norman for 33 years and been the school’s vice president for research since 2009, has long been rumored to be in the running for the OSTP job, which entails advising the president on technical issues and overseeing coordination of federal science policy. He is no stranger to Washington, D.C.; then-President George W. Bush named him to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, in 2004, and Obama reappointed him in 2011. He served as the board’s vice-chair from 2014 to 2017.He has also served as a formal and informal adviser to federal and state politicians. He leads a state science advisory panel named by Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, and advised former Oklahoma Representative Jim Bridenstine (R), now the administrator of NASA. Recently, he helped craft federal legislation aimed at bolstering weather forecasting that Congress passed last year with bipartisan support. Those connections—as well as his links to David Boren, a former Democratic senator from Oklahoma who last month retired from the OU presidency—likely helped bring Droegemeier’s name to the attention of the Trump administration.A serious scientistDroegemeier, who is 59, earned his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois in Urbana in 1985. As a researcher, he focused on numerical weather forecasting, including studies of thunderstorm dynamics, and helped develop the use of supercomputers to run atmospheric models. He helped found and lead two NSF-funded centers: One focused on the analysis and prediction of storms, the other was a hub for “collaborative adaptive sensing of the atmosphere.” His most cited paper—with 1066 citations—described a “multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction model” and was published in 2000 in the journal Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics.“His command of both science and policy issues is nearly unmatched in the community,” says Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and president of the American Meteorological Society in Boston. Wakimoto says he has known Droegemeier since graduate school and predicts he will be “a superb spokesperson for the community.”“Kelvin is one of the most respected colleagues in the field of meteorology but also has the experience and savvy to interact at the highest policy levels,” adds Marshall Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Georgia in Athens and chair of NASA’s Earth Sciences Advisory Committee.Challenges aheadIf confirmed by the Senate, Droegemeier will take the helm of an office that has been buffeted by change and uncertainty. Under Obama, OSTP’s staff grew to some 135 people, and it was active in shaping budget and policy plans, particularly in the climate change arena. Under Trump, OSTP’s staff plummeted to about 35 last year but has since grown to about 60 under the leadership of its de facto head, OSTP Deputy Chief Technology Officer Michael Kratsios.Holdren says Droegemeier has “a big challenge ahead of him. … I look forward to seeing what he’s able to accomplish in a very challenging circumstance.” Trump has a reputation for ignoring expert advice. But “it could well be that [Droegemeier is] thinking: ‘Here’s a chance to make a small difference and to at least be a small voice of reason,’” says Rick Anthes, president emeritus of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.One of Droegemeier’s first tasks, Holdren says, will be to develop strong working relationships with other senior White House staff, including the head of the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the annual budget request to Congress. Thus far, Holdren believes Trump’s budget requests, which have called for large cuts in some science agencies, “reflect that weakness of not having a senior scientist engaged as an equal in that process.” Another task, Holdren believes, will be “rebuilding the science part” of OSTP, which under Trump has emphasized technology and workforce issues.“Having such a strong leader. … as head of OSTP is essential to ensuring science is a key factor considered in the policymaking process,” says Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities in Washington, D.C. “All Americans are better off when science has a seat at the table.”Mostly, researchers are relieved that science will finally have some voice in the White House. “I wish it had happened a lot earlier,” Holdren says. “But on the other hand, many of us weren’t sure it would ever happen.”With reporting by Adrian Cho, Eric Hand, Jocelyn Kaiser, and Paul Voosen.last_img read more

Ramsey out of Juve-Lokomotiv

first_imgAaron Ramsey, as expected, is left out of Juventus’ squad to face Lokomotiv Moscow in the Champions League this evening. Ramsey is still recovering from a muscular problem, although Juve boss Maurizio Sarri insisted at a Press conference that it was only a strain. The Welshman is joined on the treatment table by long-term casualties Douglas Costa, Mattia De Sciglio, Marko Pjaca, Mattia Perin and Giorgio Chiellini. Emre Can and Mario Mandzukic, on the other hand, are ineligible due to being left out of the Bianconeri’s Champions League squad. Juve squad to face Lokomotiv: Szczesny, Pinsoglio, Buffon; De Ligt, Alex Sandro, Danilo, Bonucci, Rugani, Demiral; Pjanic, Khedira, Matuidi, Rabiot, Bentancur; Ronaldo, Dybala, Cuadrado, Higuain, Bernardeschi Watch Serie A live in the UK on Premier Sports for just £11.99 per month including live LaLiga, Eredivisie, Scottish Cup Football and more. Visit: https://subscribe.premiersports.tv/last_img read more

India vs Australia: Youth cuts tongue for India’s victory

first_imgCricket is a funny game and its fans are a crazy lot. A cricket frenzy in Tamil Nadu cut his tongue on Thursday during the World Cup semifinal match between India and Australia.  According to a TOI report, Sudhakar of Ponneri in Vellore district, sought the ‘intervention of gods’ to make India win. He was apparantely sad after Australia amassed 328 runs batting first against India in the semifinal. Eventually, India lost the match.Desperation drove the youth to act in a reckless manner and he cut his tongue with a knife at his residence, the Jolarpet police said. On his hearing Sudhakar’s cries, his relatives and neighbours came to his rescue. They rushed him to Adukkamparai government general hospital.India were bowled out for 233 runs while chasing the mammoth total of 328 runs against Australia at the Sydney Cricket Ground. India started their tour in early December with a loss to Australia and finish their tour with a loss against the same opposition. In between, they beat all opponents, barring Australia and England.What MS Dhoni said after India lost”I think they played good cricket. Over 300 is a difficult score to chase, but it was just above par. They looked like getting 350 at one stage we came back well. The fast bowlers could have done better. When you come to the knockout stages, you have to lift your game. We got off to a good start. Shikhar’s dismissal was soft. There is a pressure when you are chasing 320. I don’t think our lower-order can contribute much in these conditions. I am not sure about it. I am 33, I’m still running and maybe next year, close to the World T20 I will decide whether I want to play the next World Cup or not. Looks like these are the players who will continue forward. Thanks to both the Aussie and Indian fans. It’s a bit disappointing for the Indian fans, but in the end only one team can win.”advertisementlast_img read more

10 months agoFiorentina swoop for Sevilla attacker Luis Muriel

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your say Fiorentina swoop for Sevilla attacker Luis Murielby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFiorentina have signed Sevilla attacker Luis Muriel.Milan had been touted as favourites to sign Muriel, but he has personally chosen to join the Viola.He joins Fiorentina on-loan to the end of the season. There is an option to make the deal permanent for €13m.Fiorentina will be Muriel’s fourth Italian club after previous spells at Lecce, Udinese and Sampdoria. last_img

Church of Haile Selassie I Gets Legal Status

first_imgThe Government has officially recognised the Church of Haile Selassie I as part of the religious expression of the Rastafarian movement in Jamaica.This follows the passage of the Church of Haile Selassie I (Incorporation and Vesting) Act, 2013 in the Senate on Friday, October 25, after it was approved by the House of Representatives on October 8.Piloting the Bill in the Upper House, Justice Minister, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, noted that the legislative establishment of the Church of Haile Selassie I will further legitimise the faith and religious practices of Rastafarians and their families.Noting that this signals a historic moment in Jamaica, Senator Golding said he is particularly pleased that after spending several years before the Private Bill Committee of Parliament, the legislation “has finally successfully emerged from that process”.The Bill seeks to make provision for the incorporation of the Church of Haile Selassie I and to vest certain assets in the church and to allow it to hold property.Supporting the Bill, Opposition Senator, Robert Montague, said he is pleased that a “home grown” religion, has finally received legal status and state recognition in Jamaica.“The Rastafarian movement has contributed significantly and positively to our history. There have been incidences in the past that would need, maybe, some investigation, and lessons can be learned from that…and to encourage the Minister to reach out to the other sector groups so that they too can be legitimate,” he said.Government Senator, Lambert Brown also gave his support for the Bill, contending that it “has been a long road for the Rastafarians” who have been setting positive examples and have been preaching self-reliance as part of the way forward for the country.“I’m happy to associate with all of the progressive and positive contributions that the Rastafarians (have made to the country).  Despite oppression, despite brutality, despite all the negative things said about them by high society, they have led the way. I’m very happy that today, I can participate where we recognise the religious practices of a group of Rastafarians….I’m happy that we are recognising them today and allowing them to be part of the system, because they have been positive,” he said.Among the aims and objectives of the church are to develop the social and administrative mechanisms to organise and centralise the Rastafarian movement according to the operational guidelines, which the federation and the movement see fit; to achieve official recognition for the federation and Rastafarians,  leading towards democratic representation; and to provide cultural and political education for members of the federation, Rastafarians and for others, who conscientiously wish to become informed about the movement.The Church of Haile Selassie I was formed in 1987, by Brother Emmanuel Fox, a Rastafarian activist along with other brethrens.last_img read more

Gene Smith Urban Meyer support NCAA changes

The NCAA Board of Directors released a new, more stringent set of rules Tuesday for enforcing athletic programs’ adherence to codes of conduct. The new rules try to simplify and accelerate what has traditionally been a long and complicated rule-enforcing process. The rules also aim to increase the severity of the sanctions and make punishments more uniform instead of treating things on a case-by-case basis, according to the announcement posted on the institution’s website. Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith, first-year OSU football coach Urban Meyer and other Big Ten Conference football coaches voiced support of the revamped enforcement structure. Smith said he agrees with the new rules and says they help fix a “flawed” system. “I am supportive of the new legislation,” Smith said in an email. “It provides clarity and transparency to a system of enforcement and infraction management that was flawed. It also will improve the ability for cases to be handled more expeditiously.” Meyer said he was in favor of updating the “antiquated” system of enforcement as well. “I’m fully supportive of it. I appreciate the NCAA revisiting the discipline structure … I am in full support of very stringent penalties and keeping, or even restoring, the integrity of college football,” Meyer said during Tuesday’s Big Ten teleconference. “Throughout history, the only way to keep civilization and keep things in order is to have very strong rules and enforce them. Clear rules with very firm, swift punishment.” During the weekly teleconference, several coaches spoke on the issue, with Wisconsin coach Bret Bielema and Nebraska coach Bo Pelini saying they were fine with added responsibility for a coach. Northwestern coach Pat Fitzgerald, who was also on the call, agreed with them. “There’s no question, the level of transparency and the level of accountability needs to go up,” Fitzgerald said. “And the No. 1 person that needs to be held accountable for the coaching staff’s actions are the head coach. That’s why you are called the head coach. I think the NCAA is taking some really positive steps.” Another change involves holding head coaches more accountable for the actions of their staff. Now, violations by any member of the staff will reflect on the head coach, unless he or she can prove their personal effort for “promoting an atmosphere of compliance.” There was also a change in tiers of violations. Rather than categorizing a violation as “major” or “secondary,” there will be four levels, with a Level I violation being the most severe. The NCAA could potentially disqualify a team for multiple years of postseason play and fine the program millions of dollars for a Level I violation. Other consequences for various levels of infractions include harsher scholarship reductions, recruiting limits and head coach suspensions. Suspensions for coaches, as well as programs, can range from 10 percent of the season to a full season. The NCAA Division I Committee on Infractions will expand from 10 members to 24, speeding up the infractions process and handing out violations in a more timely manner. In OSU football’s case, this could have meant serving out OSU’s bowl ineligibility during the 2011 season rather than the current season. The last of the most significant changes in the new set of rules includes a more consistent penalty system. Sanctions will no longer be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, and the new standards will ensure equal treatment – and punishment – across the NCAA. NCAA President Mark Emmert said the rules aim to eliminate the temptation for teams to do whatever it takes to win. “We have sought all along to remove the ‘risk-reward’ analysis that has tempted people – often because of the financial pressures to win at all costs – to break the rules in the hopes that either they won’t be caught or that the consequences won’t be very harsh if they do get caught,” Emmert said during a press conference Tuesday. “The new system the board adopted today is the result of a lot of hard work and membership input devoted to protecting the collegiate model.” Emmert began the process of establishing a new set of rules in August 2011. The new enforcement structure will take effect on Aug. 1, 2013. Dan Hope and Evan Speyer contributed to this story. read more

Sloop of 53 illegal Haitian migrants intercepted and detained in Providenciales

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, August 8, 2017 – Providenciales – The Ministry of Border Control and Employment advises the public that around 2:30 a.m. today Tuesday 08th August, 2017, an illegal migrant vessel with 53 Haitian nationals was intercepted in the area of West Caicos.The interception of this 35-foot vessel, was due to the collaboration of several agencies, in particular the United States Coast Guard, TCI’s Coastal Radar Station, the Marine Branch of the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police and private citizens.    The Marine Branch confirmed the vessel as a sloop with 16 females and 37 males on board.   At approximately 4:11 a.m. the sloop arrived in Providenciales where it was met by Immigration and other Task Force officials.The 53 illegal migrants are currently detained and are being processed for repatriation and entry on the Immigration Stop List.    The last attempt of a sloop to enter the islands illegally was the interception of 99 persons on Monday 31st July, 2017, three persons were charged and the others repatriated.The Honourable Deputy Premier and Minister of Border Control and Employment, wishes again to remind persons of his Government’s commitment to improving the protection of our borders and tighter controls on immigration processes.    Additionally, he stated that illegal migration threatens the lives and livelihood of our people and that persons found to be engaged in the smuggling of humans would be prosecuted under the law.    He advises all persons to observe the immigration laws of the Turks and Caicos Islands as anyone found in breach of same will be dealt with accordingly.The Ministry of Border Control and Employment Services hereby extends its profound gratitude to persons in the community and all agencies who have assisted with this and other operations and initiatives, your contribution and support remains invaluable and critical to our success.Press Release: TCIGlast_img read more