Daniel worries about passport ‘hoo-haa’ after Brexit

first_imgDaniel O’Donnell has expressed fears that Brexit will affect his future music tours to the UK. The Donegal singer has revealed that he was always against Brexit and is hoping for a peaceful outcome to negotiations.Daniel says he worries about how the UK’s split from the EU will affect his career as he tours across the continent. Daniel is currently performing a series of shows in Branson, Missouri in the US. He told BBC Radio Ulster: “It (Brexit) shouldn’t affect people south of the border but it’s going to affect us. I think it will affect us very much in an economic way, it has to, because there’s such a trade thing with the UK and Ireland and there’s such movement between the two countries. And I know very little about economics but it’s just how I see it.“I would hate to think that every time we go to England you have a whole big hoo-haa of passports and all them little things too.”Daniel said he was personally disappointed with the UK’s vote to leave the EU and wouldn’t rule out supporting a second referendum “if the majority felt they made the wrong decision.”Daniel, who is about to release a new album for Christmas, said he hopes that Brexit will not affect peace in Northern Ireland. He said: “The one thing we must be absolute about is that it never goes back to the Troubles because of something like Brexit. It would be a pure tragedy.”Daniel O’Donnell’s new album ‘Walking In The Moonlight’ is out on 30th November and available to pre-order now.*AFDaniel worries about passport ‘hoo-haa’ after Brexit was last modified: November 25th, 2018 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Brexitdaniel o donnelllast_img read more

WCU’s Mountain Heritage Day named one of 20 best festivals in Southeast

first_imgWestern Carolina University’s Mountain Heritage Day has been named as one of the top 20 festivals in the Southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society.The announcement was made recently by the society’s office in Atlanta. Mountain Heritage Day will be listed on its websites www.EscapeToTheSoutheast.com and www.travelmediapressroom.com and promoted on social media platforms.Now in its 43rd year and scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 30, the annual celebration of Southern Appalachian music, arts, dance and culture has evolved over the years while staying true to its homespun roots. “As a folk festival, this was one of the earliest events of its kind,” said Stacy MacGregor, WCU special events director and a festival organizer. “It started with a vision for an event that links past and present and displays the essence of the region and the resourcefulness of the people who call the mountains home. Today it continues as a festival that blends mountain tradition with all the festival favorites including great food, 140-plus arts and crafts vendors, two stages with live entertainment throughout the day, tons of kids’ activities and so much more.”Mountain Heritage Day continues a tradition of being a premiere showcase for Appalachia lifestyles activities, living-history demonstrations and Cherokee stickball games. For music lovers, the performances are nonstop, with shape-note singing, bluegrass, old-time string bands and ballads from numerous stages. This year’s headline acts are Mountain Faith, an “America’s Got Talent” finalist and international award winning bluegrass band, and Country Current, the U.S. Navy’s bluegrass band.“While popular with people in Western North Carolina and reaching into east Tennessee, upstate South Carolina and northern Georgia, this recognition as a ‘Top 20’ festival exposes Mountain Heritage Day to an even greater audience,” said Mark Haskett, festival co-chair who has been involved with planning and photographing the event for more than 20 years. “This is quite an honor for a volunteer-, student- and community-supported free event like this.”Visitor participation is a large part of Mountain Heritage Day through a variety of contests centered on authentic mountain folk arts and skills, including competitions for period costumes for adults and children; canned, preserved and baked goods; and chainsaw woodcutting. Rain or shine, the festival brings history to life and fun to thousands. Shuttles operate throughout the day, with stops at designated free parking and attraction locations.“The Southeast Tourism Society’s ‘Top 20 Festival and Event’ list is an excellent guide for visitors, residents and travel writers,” said Bill Hardman, president and CEO of the Southeast Tourism Society. “The events selected represent the best, and often most unique, activities in our region.”The Southeast Tourism Society was founded in 1983 and is headquartered in Atlanta. The nonprofit promotes tourism for 12 states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia.Mountain Heritage Day is part of the Blue Ridge Music Trails of North Carolina, with www.BlueRidgeMusicNC.com providing an easy and convenient way to find festivals, concerts, jam sessions and plenty of singing and dancing to the traditional music of Western North Carolina. To learn more about WCU’s festival, visit www.mountainheritageday.com or call 828-227-3039.last_img read more

Google Search Has 90% Market Share in France – Could This Happen Worldwide?

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#Analysis#search#Statistics#web Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Our network blog AltSearchEngines reports that Google has around 90% search engine market share in France (well, 89.98% to be exact!). The next biggest is Yahoo ! (3.17%), followed by MSN (2.33%). Over the past year, between August 2006 and August 2007, Google has gone up by 3.76%. Whereas its 4 main competitors have all lost ground in the same time span, as indicated by this graph:SourceIf you think about how Microsoft peaked at nearly 90% market share with IE6 in the early 2000s – and it still has over 75% even now – one wonders if Google Search will ever gain that kind of dominance worldwide? Already Google has shown it has a lot of sway over social networks, having enticed all the main players but Facebook to sign up to its set of API standards called OpenSocial. So Google is setting standards now in search and social networking, the two most popular activities on the Web.Recent comScore research put Google at just over 60% market share for search engines worldwide, and Yahoo second with around 14%. Third? Not Microsoft, but Chinese search engine Baidu with about 5%. Microsoft has around 3.5% share worldwide in search engines, according to comScore.Source: comScoreGoogle’s worldwide share looks even better at Net Applications, where Google sites account for 71% + of worldwide search market share. Yahoo has roughly 10% in those stats. However Baidu only gets 0.10% in Net Applications, so I suspect comScore’s figures are closer to the truth.Source: Net ApplicationsGoing back to the France results, Google has 90% market share there – can they do it in other major countries, like the US and China? You’d have to say no on China, based on Baidu’s lead there. But in the US and other major countries, Google is becoming more and more powerful. However, no need to raise alarm bells yet in the US. The latest Hitwise stats for the US show Google with 63.55% market share, up 2.62% from the year before. Yahoo is holding steady at 22%, according to Hitwise.Still, it’s worth keeping an eye on the global stats. If Google can hit 90% in a large market like France, well it could happen elsewhere too.center_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… richard macmanus 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Google’s Matt Cutts: Good Content Trumps SEO

first_imgIT + Project Management: A Love Affair Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… joe brockmeier 1 Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now This is a message that can’t possibly be repeated often enough: Good content trumps SEO. Don’t believe me? Fair enough, but how about the head of Google’s webspam team? In a short video today on Google’s Webmaster Central Channel, Cutts answers a question about SEO practices and whether “poor” sites with bad SEO are penalized by Google.Reassuringly, no. Cutts dispels the idea that sites that don’t validate well will be dinged by Google despite good content. “Just because somebody dots every i and crosses every t and gets all their HTML structure right, doesn’t mean that it’s good content.” Tags:#enterprise#news “Even if you do brain-dead stupid things and shoot yourself in the foot, but have good content, we still want to return it,” says Cutts. In fact, Cutts says that Google tries to make it so that sites “don’t have to do SEO.” First and foremost is content, and there’s no bonus for having good SEO. So if you’re planning that 2012 site budget, you might want to think twice about hiring that SEO expert and find a content expert instead.last_img read more

Back to basics: Understanding your paid search metrics

first_img HomeDigital MarketingBack to basics: Understanding your paid search metrics Posted on 28th November 2019Digital Marketing FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Related postsThe California Consumer Privacy Act goes live in a few short weeks — Are you ready?14th December 2019Lytics now integrates with Google Marketing Platform to enable customer data-informed campaigns14th December 2019ML 2019121313th December 2019Global email benchmark report finds email isn’t dead – it’s essential13th December 20192019 benchmark report: brand vs. non-brand traffic in Google Shopping12th December 2019Keep your LinkedIn advertising strategy focused in 202012th December 2019 One of the great things about paid search is the fact that you can track everything. If someone visits your store after seeing your billboard or TV spot, there’s no real way to trace that. However, if someone sees your paid search ad and visits your website, you know how they got to your site. You know which ad they saw, what copy they responded to and even what search term triggered your ad.There’s so much data that it can be hard to figure out what it all means or what to do with it. Impression counts, clickthrough rates, cost-per-click…how do you sort through it all and use your paid search metrics to make intelligent decisions?I mean, what’s the point of having all of that data if you don’t know what to do with it?To make matters worse, a lot of this data can be hard to properly interpret, so even experienced online marketers often draw the wrong conclusions from their data or focus on the wrong metrics in their accounts. So, if you’ve ever stared at your paid search account and wondered, “What am I missing?”, this article is for you.Are you focused on the right paid search metrics?If you’re like most online marketers, you probably have several campaigns running, at least a dozen ads and over a hundred keywords to keep track of. And that’s if your account is on the small side.Every one of those campaigns, ads, ad groups and keywords can give you a wealth of information about your audience and how effective your advertising is…but only if you know how to use your data.These days, paid search is so competitive that it isn’t enough to simply set up Google Analytics and keep an eye on your cost-per-click. You need to know how to interpret every aspect of your paid search data and use it to optimize the performance of your account.Now, while that might sound like a daunting task, most of the information in your paid search account can be broken down into three manageable pieces: information about your traffic, information about conversions and information about sales.Let’s take a look at each of these three types of data and how you can use them to interpret what’s happening in your paid search account.What sort of traffic are you getting?When it comes to paid search advertising, most marketers tend to focus on traffic-related metrics like impressions, cost-per-click (CPC) or click-through rate (CTR). After all, the main reason why you run paid search campaigns is to drive more traffic to your website.And, not surprisingly, paid search platforms like Google Ads and Bing Ads are full of traffic-related information: device segmentation data, keyword info, impression share insights, and more. For Google and Bing, this info is incredibly easy to track and supply and it’s what most of their users are interested in.What you can learn from traffic dataWhile all of this traffic data is certainly handy, it’s only useful if you know what to do with it. That being said, your traffic data tells you a lot about how well your campaigns are working for your target audience.If no one is clicking on your ads, there’s a good chance that your ad copy needs some work…or you’re targeting the wrong keywords. If your cost-per-click is too high, you might need to rethink your bidding strategy. If you’re not getting enough impression share on your best campaigns, you probably need to consider shifting your budget around.For example, say you’re running paid search ads for a local attorney. On average, this client makes $3,200 from a new client and spends about $1,200 taking care of them.In your most recent review of your campaigns, you review your traffic data and put the following report together:From the data above, it’s easy to see which campaign is generating the best results. Campaign #3 produces more clicks at a lower cost-per-click than any of your other campaigns. In contrast, while you spent over twice as much on campaign #4, you got one-third of the clicks you got from campaign #3.Clearly, you either need to shut down campaign #4 and put its budget into a better campaign like #3 or invest some time into figuring out why campaign #4 is performing so poorly.However, before you make any decisions, we should probably talk about the other two types of data in your account. After all, your attorney friend doesn’t make money from clicks. To make money, she needs leads…and none of this data tells you whether or not all of those clicks are actually turning into leads.Is your traffic converting?So, with that in mind, let’s talk about conversion data. Because Google and Bing often can’t tell what a conversion is for your website, it takes some extra work to set up conversion tracking for your site. And, as a result, almost half of paid search advertisers don’t track their campaigns beyond traffic data.But here’s the thing, without conversion data, you can’t answer the following two critical questions about your paid search campaigns.1. Is my website (or landing page) a good fit for my traffic?Paid search marketing is intent-based marketing. When someone searches for something on Google or Bing and clicks on your ad, they’re actively looking for a solution to a problem…a problem they think your business can help them with.Their click is an act of faith in your business and the page they land on after clicking shows them whether or not their faith was justified. If your landing page or website meets their expectations, a decent percentage of people should convert. If not, they’ll leave.So, if your conversion rate is high, then your destination page is a good fit for your traffic. However, if your conversion rate is low, it means that something is off. Your landing page or site isn’t working for your traffic, so they’re leaving to find something better.If you find yourself in the latter situation, you may want to take a hard look at the page you’re sending traffic to. You may need to rethink your page and site experience to bring it into closer alignment with the expectations of your traffic.2. Is your traffic a good fit for your landing page?Of course, the opposite might be true, too. If your landing page seems like it should be converting traffic, but it isn’t, your ads may be sending the wrong people to your page.If people click on your ads because they want a divorce attorney, but you’re a personal injury firm, will they convert? The wrong traffic never converts, regardless of how good your site is.In this situation, it’s often a good idea to look at the search terms people are using to find your ads and the actual ad copy that you’re using. If it seems like you’re attracting clicks from the wrong people, you may need to rework your advertising strategy to target the right audience.What you can learn from conversion dataOnce you have set up conversion tracking, look beyond traffic data and see how your campaigns did in terms of conversions.Although it doesn’t have the best conversion rate (CR), campaign #3 gets enough cheap clicks that it still has the best cost-per-lead. And, as before, campaign #4 is still a lost cause. Between a low conversion rate and high cost-per-click, it’s producing leads at almost ten times the cost of a lead from campaign #3.With an 8 percent conversion rate, it doesn’t seem like either of these campaigns are targeting the wrong traffic, but they could probably both benefit from a little conversion rate optimization on their destination pages.However, while this data paints a clearer picture, your attorney friend still doesn’t make money off of leads. She needs to close new clients. To get at that information, we need to look at our sales data.Are you making sales?As helpful as traffic and conversion data are, they still don’t tell you whether or not your campaigns are making money. And, if your campaigns aren’t making money, why are you running them?Unfortunately, tracking your paid search campaigns clear through to sales data can be tricky. E-commerce is pretty straightforward, but once you get beyond that, it can be hard to connect your actual sales data to your campaign performance. You often need some sort of CRM like Salesforce and you have to figure out how to connect all of the dots.But is it worth it? Absolutely. Let’s take a look at what the sales data for our hypothetical law firm’s campaigns shows.All of sudden, campaign #4 just went from zero to hero. It might not have a great CPC or conversion rate, but its return-on-ad-spend (ROAS) is almost twice the ROAS of any other campaign.So what does this actually tell us? Well, for one thing, it’s clear that campaign #4 appeals to people who are much more likely to buy than the people in any of the other campaigns. Campaign #3 might drive a lot more traffic, but that traffic is far less likely to sign up for our attorney friend’s services.Does this mean that campaign #3 is bad? With a ROAS of 92 percent, it’s certainly losing money right now, but it has a lot going for it on the traffic and data front. Before you can pass judgement on it, you’ll need to dive into that data and see if there is any way to turn all of that potential into actual sales.Maybe you need to change your ad messaging to filter out people who aren’t likely to actually become a client. Maybe you could tweak the landing page to better appeal to potential clients. Maybe your attorney friend just needs some coaching on how to respond to leads from this campaign.In any case, without this sales data, it would have been easy to assume that campaign #4 was a complete loss and campaign #3 deserved more of your budget – when, in fact, the opposite was actually true. This is why sales data is so important. Traffic and conversion data teach you useful things about your campaigns, but only sales data answers the question, “Are my ads actually making money?”ConclusionYour paid search account is full of valuable information, but turning all of that data into actionable information can sometimes seem overwhelming. The trick is making sure that you have access to all of the data that you need to make educated decisions and then knowing what each type of data tells you.Now that you know how to interpret your data, all you have to do is start digging through your paid search metrics. Opportunities to improve your account should quickly become apparent. Good luck!This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, click here.https://searchengineland.com/back-to-basics-understanding-your-paid-search-metrics-325799The post Back to basics: Understanding your paid search metrics appeared first on Marketing Land.From our sponsors: Back to basics: Understanding your paid search metrics Back to basics: Understanding your paid search metricsYou are here:last_img read more

Spice’s watchlist scours the finest watches

first_imgIn the study of clocks, complication refers to any feature beyond the simple display of hours, minutes, and seconds. The more complications in a watch, the more difficult it is to design, create, assemble and repair. A connoisseur’s collection grows with his taste in complications. Some great creations… Bvlgari: OctomaseratiBvlgari,In the study of clocks, complication refers to any feature beyond the simple display of hours, minutes, and seconds. The more complications in a watch, the more difficult it is to design, create, assemble and repair. A connoisseur’s collection grows with his taste in complications. Some great creations…Bvlgari: OctomaseratiBvlgari and Maserati’s unique collaboration creates a focus on graphic layouts providing time measurement information including a jumping hour, and four retrograde displays. This creation merges the expertise inherent in each of the two firms based on a broad range of shared references: precision, performance expertise, style and elegance.Case: 45mm steel.Complication: Central chronograph seconds hand.Omega: De Ville ChronographThe De Ville line has long been known not only for its elegant styling but for its introduction to the brand’s most important watchmaking innovations. The 1999 De Ville saw Omega launch its calibre 2500 equipped with a co-axial escapement, and it was in the De Ville Hour Vision annual calendar that the Si14 silicon balance spring made its debut. This new model’s co-axial calibre 9301 has an 18-carat gold rotor and balance bridge, a central chronograph seconds hand as well as gold diamond-polished central hour and minute hands. Its applied roman indexes are also crafted from gold, facetted on the sides and ends and fully diamond-polished.Case: 42mm; 18-carat red gold.Complication: Time zone function.Richard Mille: RM 037Created from skeletonised grade five titanium, the new piece sports a new stem-crown mechanism, patented by Richard Mille. The machine tooling process requires two days of adjustment separately for the bezel, the caseband, and the case back. The empty case requires more than 255 tooling operations and more than five hours of glazing and polishing in the final stage.Case: 52.20mm tall by 34.40mm wide.Complication: 50-hour power reserve.advertisementRolex: Perpetual Sky DwellerWith 14 patents, five of which are new, the watch provides, in an unprecedented and highly original way, the information global travellers need to easily keep track of time: a dual time zone, with local time read via centre hands and a reference time display in 24-hour format read via a rotating off-centre disc visible on the dial. It also equipped with a new calibre, the 9001, an officially certified Swiss chronometer entirely developed by Rolex.Case: 42mm oyster case.Complication: Dual time zone and 24-hour display.Cartier: Rotonde Annual CalendarElegance is the art of balance and the sum of an equation that connoisseurs of fine objects define as the golden number. Cartier has chosen to incorporate an annual calendar mechanism directly into the plate of the 1904 MC calibre. This refined movement incorporates a semi-instantaneous mechanism for converting the large date into two independent numerals. It also carries within it a simple and intelligent mechanism which makes it possible to display, without any possibility of error, the months having 30 or 31 days, once the current month has been set.Case: 45mm 18-carat pink gold.Complication: Annual calendar.IWC: Big Pilot Perpetual CalendarThe piece unites the clear-cut instrument look of the 1940s and IWC’s tradition of manufacturing Pilot’s watches with the wish to benefit from the technological advances of the 21st century. The elaborately equipped watch comes with a host of advanced features, including a perpetual calendar with its four-digit year display, moon phase display and seven-day power reserve. The tiny aircraft silhouette on the seconds hand also creates an eye-catching signal-red highlight on the monochrome dial.Case: 48mm.Complication: Perpetual calendar with four-digit year, moon phase.Longines: 180th Anniversary ChronographBased in Saint-Imier since 1832, the watchmaker is celebrating its 180th anniversary by presenting a reminder of the first chronographs closely based on the first wrist chronograph. The new model uses calibre L788, a column-wheel chronograph movement developed exclusively for Longines which enables the wearer to activate the various chronograph functions by simply pressing on the push-piece integrated into the crown. The sleek lines and the distinctive lugs provide these new models with a subtle balance between classical and contemporary design.Case: 39mm.Complication: Chronograph central seconds sweep.Ulysse Nardin: El ToroThe striking aesthetic of El Toro combines sapphire crystals and ceramic with a timeless dial design that inspired its powerful name. This high tech perpetual calendar with a dual time function adjusts forward and backward in seconds over the quick corrector position of a single crown. The oversized date, the day, the month and the year change instantly forward or backward when the hour hand is moved to a new local time across the dateline with pushers. The manufactured self-winding movement strives to be the most consumer friendly perpetual calendar ever produced.Case: 43mm, 18-carat rose gold, blue ceramic bezel.Complication: Perpetual calendar with dual time function.advertisementRoger Dubuis: La MonegasqueHonouring the spirit of Monte Carlo, its legendary history and world of glamour, La Monegasque is a line that demonstrates the company’s creativity. Here the breathtaking race of time seems suspended in all the refinement and beauty of the complication that is most associated with fine watchmaking: the flying tourbillon. A window opens onto a silvered disc with a brushed sunray effect is enhanced by the power-reserve indicator and the pink gold flying tourbillon. a rhodium-plated intermediate dial carries the white transferred markers outlined in black. Lastly, a brushed anthracite circle surrounds it, given depth with silvered snailing, black transfers and pink gold edge.Case: 44mm 18-carat pink gold.Complication: Flying tourbillon.Zenith: El Primero Chronomaster open grande date moon and sunphaseThe timepiece inspired by the captain line created in 1952, makes a clear allusion to historic timepieces with dauphine hands, facetted with rhodium-plating and hand set long markers. The manufactured movements, decorated with cotes de geneve and circular graining are visible through a sapphire case back. The model reproduces the various stages of the lunar cycle what had only been previously available in Zenith’s pocket watches. It is displayed in an aperture at 6 o’clock and the date is displayed at half past one.Case: 45mm; 18-carat rose gold.Complication: Integrated chronograph, moon and sun phases.Seiko: AnantaA sanskrit word that means ‘the infinite’ this watch was made to embody the most technologically advanced craftsmanship in the world.Case: 46mm sapphire crystal.Complication: Spring drive chronograph.De Grisogono: Otturatore Imagined by Fawaz Gruosi, the centrepiece of this unprecedented creation is a high-performance mobile sequencer.Case: 45mm wide and 50mm tall.Complication: On demand moon phase and date.Blancpain: Villeret Squelette 8 JoursThis entirely openworked and decorated movement is fully visible through the two sapphire crystals on the front and back.Case: 38mm white gold.Complication: Flying tourbillon.Van Cleef: Midnight Poetic wishThe exotic watch enables collectors, wherever they are in the world, to look at the exact position of the stars in the sky of Paris.Case: 43mm; 18-carat white gold.Complication: Paris sky star map.last_img read more

11 days ago​Vlatko Andonovski poised to become new coach of US women’s team

first_img​Vlatko Andonovski poised to become new coach of US women’s teamby Ian Ferris11 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveVlatko Andonovski is set to become the new head coach of the United States women’s football team.The 43-year-old is currently in charge of National Women’s Soccer League side Reign FC in Seattle.Previous head coach Jill Ellis took charge of her final game on 6 October, having won two World Cups with the US. TagsMLS NewsAbout the authorIan FerrisShare the loveHave your saylast_img

Mens hockey Late goals provided momentum in Game One against Michigan

Ohio State players celebrate after a goal by junior forward Kevin Miller. Credit: Nick Clarkson | Lantern reporterGoals within the final minute of periods have the ability to build momentum, and Ohio State took advantage by netting two of them.On Friday night, the Buckeyes (17-8-6, 8-6-1-1) defeated the Michigan Wolverines (9-17-3, 2-11-2-2) by a score of 4-2. While the Wolverines took the early lead, it was a breakthrough by OSU senior forward David Gust that swung the momentum of the game in favor of the Buckeyes.An interference penalty late in the first period on Michigan defenseman Joseph Cecconi provided the first of the influential power play goals.Sophomore forward Dakota Joshua attacked the net with a powerful wrist shot that deflected off of Michigan goalie Jack Lafontaine. Simultaneously, Gust set himself up in front of goal to put in the rebound with a backhand shot with less than a second left in the first period.In the second period, a late power-play goal by senior forward Nick Schilkey increased the Buckeyes’ lead to two goals. Schilkey set himself up for a rebound similar to Gust and put the puck in net with six seconds left. His 24th goal of the season turned out to be the final tally in the game.Coaches preach to their players that the final two minutes of every period are the most crucial times in a game, and OSU’s Steve Rohlik reaffirmed that message.“It was a difference in the game,” he said. “You score with 0.1 and six seconds left, it’s a heartbreaker for the other team.”The momentum these types of goals create were evident in the flow of the game. Following Gust’s tally, the Buckeyes picked up two quick second-period goals from junior forward Kevin Miller.“Getting (Gust’s late goal) gets us back in the hockey game and you want to build off of late goals like that one,” Joshua said. “We most certainly did coming out and getting those two goals in the second period.”Miller did not focus on his two quick goals, but rather the momentum Gust’s goal had heading into the first break.“You see it all the time in hockey. If there’s a late goal in a period, it really has some momentum heading into the intermission,” said Miller.For the team, OSU will look to carry the momentum gained from Friday’s game into Saturday’s rematch with Michigan. Puck drop is at 5 p.m. for their final regular season matchup with the Wolverines. read more

Ohio State mens tennis team seeks 1st NCAA championship

The Ohio State men’s tennis team will begin NCAA Tournament action at home Friday. The Buckeyes are going into the tournament as the No. 4 seed, and they will look to bring home their first-ever national title. Sixty-four teams from around the nation were selected May 3 to be part of the 2011 NCAA Championship Tournament. The Buckeyes were one of 31 teams that automatically qualified for the tournament by winning their conference championship. OSU earned that bid May 1, when it clinched its sixth consecutive Big Ten Tournament title in Madison, Wis. OSU will begin the NCAA Tournament with home-field advantage. The team will host Notre Dame, East Tennessee State and Ball State for the first two rounds of the six-round tournament Friday and Saturday. “It’s always much easier to win at home than on the road,” said coach Ty Tucker of the advantage. OSU (30-2) opens the NCAA Tournament against Ball State (15-14). The last time the Buckeyes played the Cardinals was during the 1994–95 season. Overall, OSU is 9-3 against Ball State. “After two weeks off, you have to establish in the first round that you’re ready to play,” Tucker said of the Friday match. If the team advances past the first two rounds, the Buckeyes will travel to Stanford, Calif., to compete. “We need to focus on the first two rounds,” senior co-captain Balazs Novak said. The biggest competitors the Buckeyes could face throughout the tournament are Virginia and USC, Tucker said. OSU lost to Virginia once already this season, 4-1, in February. “There are a lot of good teams,” senior co-captain Matt Allare said. “Virginia hasn’t been beaten at all, and USC are the back-to-back champions.” The last time the Buckeyes made it to the NCAA Tournament finals was in 2009, when they fell to USC, the reigning national champion. “We’re No. 4 in the nation, but you look at other teams and they’re so good,” senior co-captain Shuhei Uzawa said. “We just need to give it everything we’ve got.” Despite the tough competition, OSU’s ultimate goal is to bring home the national title. “That’s one of the three or four goals every year,” Tucker said. “I think that has to be the goal.” Novak said winning the championship title would be a great achievement for the team and that it would mean everything. The first match in Columbus will be between Notre Dame and East Tennessee State at 10 a.m. Friday at the Stickney Tennis Center. read more

Football DreMont Jones selected No 71 overall by Denver in 2019 NFL

Ohio State redshirt junior defensive lineman Dre’Mont Jones (86) leads the Buckeyes out on the field to start the 2018 Spring Game on April 14, 2018. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignOhio State produced its fifth defensive line prospect in two years Friday, when former defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones heard his name called as the No. 71 selection by the Denver Broncos in the 2019 NFL Draft.Jones finished his Ohio State career with 114 tackles (22 TFL), 9.5 sacks, three fumble recoveries and a pick-six this past season against TCU.The former Buckeye earned third-team all-Big Ten honors at defensive tackle in 2017, followed by first-team all-Big Ten honors in 2018.Jones’ redshirt junior season was arguably his best, as he finished with career-highs in tackles for loss (13) and sacks (8.5).The St. Ignatius product declared for the NFL Draft in the weeks prior to Ohio State’s contest against Washington in the Rose Bowl, but still participated in the game. read more