Klopp Out of form Firmino doesnt need a break

first_imgLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp insists there are no concerns over Roberto Firmino ahead of tonight’s Champions League game at Red Star BelgradeThe Brazilian striker has only found the net once in nine games, amid suggestions that he could be in need of a rest.Aside from playing more Premier League games than any other player since the start of last season, Firmino had been actively involved in Liverpool’s run to the Champions League final.He also represented Brazil at the 2018 World Cup in Russia.But Klopp remains unconcerned over Firmino and claims that he remains a key member of the squad regardless of his lack of goals.divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“No. He’s hard-working, sometimes better, sometimes a bit less, but good. That’s how it is,” Klopp told reporters on YouTube.“It will be all fine for sure. If he didn’t score in the last few games then… one in nine? All competitions? Didn’t he score against Red Star? That was the one goal he scored? Okay, good.“I am not concerned. Things like this happen. He is a very important player for us. I was not really happy with our defending first half in London and he was involved in that. That’s what I’m talking about.“In the end, everything will be fine. We know about these situations. Sometimes it is clicking easier than in other moments, that’s all. There are no concerns.”The Group C game between Red Star and Liverpool will begin at 18:55 (CEST).last_img read more

Samsung reveals new Galaxy A phones at MWC

first_img Mobile World Congress 2019 • Snap serious selfies with Samsung’s Galaxy A30 and A50 See All Samsung’s Galaxy A30 was revealed Monday. Jessica Dolcourt/CNET Samsung announced a pair of fresh phones in its midrange Galaxy A series during Mobile World Congress on Monday.The Galaxy A50 and A30 are the initial models for 2019, and both feature 6.4-inch 1,080×2,340-pixel Super AMOLED Infinity-U displays, with dimensions of 158.5 by 74.7 by 7.7mm.The differences start with the cameras — the A50 has a 25-megapixel camera on the front, with 25-, 5- and 8-megapixel options on the back (continuing the triple-rear camera trend). The A30 has a 16-megapixel one on the front, and 16- and 5-megapixel cameras at the rear. Memory-wise, you can get the A50 with 4 or 6GB of RAM and 64 or 128GB internal storage. The A30 comes with either 3 or 4GB RAM and 32 or 64 GB internal storage.samsung-a30The A30 has 16- and 5-megapixel cameras on the back. Jessica Dolcourt/CNET The A50 is available in four colors: black, white, blue and coral (which is apparently “inspired by scattered light”). It also comes equipped with on-screen fingerprint unlocking.The A series may not be Samsung’s flagship Galaxy line (the S series still holds that crown), but still offers full access to its ecosystem — so you can use Samsung Health, Samsung Pay, Bixby and other features. Jun 1 • The Nubia Alpha looks like either a house arrest bracelet or Batman’s phone “People are changing the way they connect, and their smartphones need to keep up,” said DJ Koh, head of Samsung’s mobile business, in a release. “Our new Galaxy A Series offers improvements to the essential features that will support these live interactions, with diverse options to meet their ever-changing needs.”We’ve reached out to Samsung for details on pricing and a release date.Last week, Samsung unveiled its much-hyped flexible Galaxy Fold and a quartet of Galaxy S10 models.First published at 2:35 a.m. PT.Updated at 3:55 a.m. PT: Adds more details. Tags Now playing: Watch this: reading • Samsung reveals new Galaxy A phones at MWC Samsung’s Galaxy A30 and A50 tiptoe into MWC 2019 Share your voice May 13 • Galaxy S10E vs. iPhone XR: Every spec compared 16 Photos 1 Comment Jul 9 • Killer cameras and battery life might meet their match in the Note 10 1:37 Jun 29 • Galaxy S10 5G, OnePlus 7 Pro LG V50 ThinQ 5G: Why you shouldn’t rush to buy a 5G phone Mobile World Congress 2019 Phones Mobile Samsunglast_img read more

Who wrote the judgment from where Hasina

first_imgPM Sheikh Hasina speaks in parliament on Wednesday. Photo: PIDParliament on Wednesday unanimously adopted a resolution to take proper legal steps against the declaration of the 16th constitutional amendment as ‘ultra vires’ and cancelling unconstitutional, objectionable and irrelevant observations of the chief justice in the Appellate Division verdict.Jasod lawmaker Moin Uddin Khan Badal placed the resolution in the House under the provision 147 (1) of the Rules of Procedure around 6:00pm when speaker Shirin Sharmin Chaudhury was in the chair.The resolution was adopted by a voice vote following a marathon general discussion over it, which lasted for more than five hours.The resolution reads, “Appropriate legal steps should be taken for cancelling the declaration of the 16th constitution amendment as ‘ultra vires’ and scrapping unconstitutional, objectionable and irrelevant observations of the chief justice over Parliament and other important issues in the verdict of the 16th amendment case.”Joining the discussion, MPs across the board harshly criticised chief justice Surendra Kumar Sinha for his various remarks in the Supreme Court verdict that upheld the High Court judgment declaring ‘ultra vires’ the 16th amendment to the constitution – that is, in violation of it.Participating in the discussion, prime minister Sheikh Hasina said the judgment was full of contradictions which is not acceptable.”There are so many contradictions even self-contradictions in this judgment. This is not acceptable to us. Who wrote this judgment from where?” she said.The prime minister also said that the constitution did not provide the apex court with the authority to amend the constitution.She said the CJ’s remarks regarding Bangabadhu are similar with that of anti-liberation people. “He (CJ) dishonoured the role of father of the nation Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman.”Sheikh Hasina said three organs of the country are complementary to each other. None shall undermine another. Everyone should run following the laws. Everybody should have accountability, she added.About the Supreme Judicial Council formulated during the martial law she said this whole judiciary has been put under his sole authority with the introduction of the council. “If the CJ becomes angry with anyone, he can remove him from his post,” she added.The prime minister said the CJ also undermined the president in this verdict.Noting that the CJ claimed the Supreme Judicial Council became aligned with the basic structures of the constitution, Sheikh Hasina questioned the motive of such claim.”This verdict did not get any acceptability from anyone of the country,” she said adding that only BNP became cheerful without going through the whole text of the verdict properly as the supreme judicial council was restored.Law minister Anisul Huq categorically said this judgment will not go without final legal challenge. “We’ve already start working in this regard.”He said the judgment was not delivered based on logics rather it was emotional and came out of hatred. “The verdict tarnished image of not only the judiciary, but also the whole country.”Commerce minister Tofail Ahmed said the chief justice termed MPs ‘immature’ in the verdict. “The justices appointed by the president, who is elected by us (MPs), are mature, but we are immature!” he said.He said the CJ tried to make BNP cheerful through this judgment in a time when the country was marching forward under the leadership of the Prime Minister.Noting that the CJ asked the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) not to conduct investigation against a judge, Tofail said, “The ACC can investigate graft charges of you (PM), me and all, but not justices. What a surprise!”Talking about the Supreme Judiciary Council introduced in 1977, the AL leader said The Council did not investigate charge even against a single justice in the last 40 years.Liberation war affairs minister AKM Mozzamel Huq said there are many corruption allegations against the incumbent chief justice and now the people fear whether they will get justice in graft allegations against the chief justice if he will remain in the post.It is not possible to get justice over the corrupt charges keeping SK Sinha in the post. So, it is essential to investigate the graft charges relieving him from the post, he said.Noting that the chief justice made many unnecessary and irrelevant remarks over Bangabandhu in the verdict the minister said, “It is natural that he does not know about Bangabandhu as he is self-declared peace committee member.”AL MP Sheikh Fazlul Karim Selim said the sedition charge can be brought against the chief justice for violating several articles including 27, 94 and 116 of the constitution.”You broke your oath. The chief justice, you worked against parliament, people, MPs and the constitution. You [CJ] are hatching conspiracy against the country. So, you can be brought to the book on sedition charge.””It is you [CJ] who will have to cancel the judgment that delivered by yourself against the state and the constitution. If you don’t cancel it, please wait for what steps to be taken,” he warned.Selim urged the chief justice to seek apology to the nation confessing mistakes. “Admit that I [CJ] did mistake and say that I myself am correcting it. I’ll not do such mistake anymore… If you do exaggeration, please be prepared. You are not mightier than this parliament,” the AL MP said.Jatiya Party MP Fakhrul Imam said the president, the prime minister, ministers and justices take oath to protect the constitution, but there is no word ‘to protect the constitution’ in oath content for MPs as the lawmakers are creators of the constitution.In the resolution, Badal said chief justice Surendra Kumar Sinha termed Members of Parliament ‘immature’ alongside making unnecessary and unwanted remarks regarding many irrelevant issues in his observation in the verdict of the 16th amendment case. So, huge discussions and remours continue over it, which is not expected for the whole nation, he added.”This parliament wants end of the situation following massive discussion so that efforts of any evil and anti-people force to catch fish in trouble water would be thwarted,” he said.On 17 September 2014, the Jatiya Sangsad passed the 16th amendment to the constitution empowering parliament to remove justices of the Supreme Court on ground of incapacity and misbehaviour.On 3 July 2017, the Appellate Division passed down the verdict upholding the judgment of the High Court. And the full-text of the verdict was released on 1 August last.last_img read more

Clash over land leaves 2 dead in Moulvibazar

first_imgMoulvibazarTwo people were killed and 40 others injured in a clash between two groups of villagers over a disputed land at Pammadpur in Moulvibazar district town on Saturday, reports UNB.The deceased were identified as Shafiqur, 22, son of Mobabark Ali and Abdul Malik, 55, son of Warish Mia of the same village.Quoting locals, police said, Lebas Mia and Elaich Mia were in loggerhead for long over a land.As a sequel to previous enmity, supporters of the duo attacked each other around 9:30 am that left two people, belonging to Lebus group, dead on the spot and 40 others from both groups injured.Later, some of the injured were taken to Moulvibazar 250- bed hospital and others to Sylhet Osmani Medical College and Hospital.On information, police rushed in and brought the situation under control, said Rashedul Islam, additional police super of the district.Additional forces have been deployed to avoid further trouble, added Rashedul.last_img read more

PM reaches Nepal to attend BIMSTEC Summit

first_imgA VVIP flight of Biman Bangladesh Airlines carrying the prime minister and her entourage left Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport for Kathmandu at 8:05am, reports UNB.The flight landed at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu at 9:05 am local time (9:20am Bangladesh time).Sheikh Hasina was escorted to Hotel Soaltee Crowne Plaza at Tahachal Marg in Kathmandu by a ceremonial motorcade where she will be staying during her visit.Later in the day, the permier will meet Nepalese president Bidya Devi Bhandari at Sheetal Nibash, the Presidential Palace, in the capital city.She will also attend a luncheon there to be hosted by the Nepalese president.In the afternoon, the Bangladesh prime minister along with other leaders will attend the opening session of the 4th BIMSTEC Summit at Hotel Soaltee Crowne Plaza.In the evening, she will hold a meeting with her Indian counterpart Narendra Modi.Hasina and other leaders will also join a gala dinner to be hosted by Nepalese prime minister KP Sharma Oli in the city’s Hyatt Regency Hotel in the evening.The prime minister is expected to return home on Friday noon. Prime minister Sheikh Hasina. File PhotoPrime minister Sheikh Hasina reached Kathmandu on a two-day official visit to Nepal to attend the 4th BIMSTEC Summit.The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) having seven member states — Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand — came into being on 6 June 1997 through the Bangkok Declaration.last_img read more

Narayanganj man set on fire succumbs to injuries

first_imgA man, who was allegedly put on fire by some drug traders over a drug-related dispute in Fatullah, Narayanganj succumbed to his injuries at Dhaka Medical College and Hospital (DMCH) on Saturday–reports UNB.The victim is Suman, 38, son of Abdul Jalil of Mahasadair Pakapul area in Fatullah of sadar upazila.Victim’s wife Sumi said a local resident who was known to them, Sohel Mandal, younger brother of Aslam Mandal, former Enayetnagar Union member called her husband out around 9:00pm on Friday night.A few minutes later she rushed to the spot and after hearing the screaming of her husband on the road, found him with burn injuries.Severely injured Suman was rushed to local hospital and later shifted to DMCH as his condition deteriorated.Before losing his battle for life, Suman told his relatives that he had an argument with local drug dealer Biplab, his wife Sahela Begum and accomplice Sohel Mandal, over a payment which he gave Biplab earlier as a loan.At one stage, Biplab and his associates attacked him and poured kerosene on him and set him on fire.Officer-in-charge of Fatullah police station Shah Manjur Kader said they were investigating the matter.Meanwhile, Biplab denied the allegation and said Suman immolated himself as he was a drug addict.last_img read more

Inside the progressive movement roiling Democratic Party

first_imgDemocratic Party logoIn another year, Donna Shalala might have had an easy ride to Washington.Running to become a first-time congresswoman in a Miami seat at age 77, Shalala has long been a member of the Democratic Party elite, with a deep resume that includes supervising US health policy for former president Bill Clinton. Her slogan, printed on the back of her staff’s t-shirts, could have come from Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign playbook: “Ready on Day One.”But this season, Shalala’s record has put her at odds with the surging progressive wing of the Democratic Party. Once derided as the most liberal member of the Clinton administration, Shalala now faces attacks from challengers who contend she is not nearly progressive enough.Taking nothing for granted, Shalala delivered hot dogs to voters at a campaign barbeque on a recent steamy Saturday. “I’m running like I’m 20 points behind,” she said.Less than three months before the midterm elections, a rising progressive movement is roiling the Democratic Party – fueled by fury at Republican president Donald Trump’s administration, a growing populism among voters impatient for seismic change, and resentment of party leaders who have presided over a losing streak in national elections.Republicans disparage Democratic progressives as wild-eyed radicals led by a 28-year-old political neophyte, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, whose take-down of senior Democratic leader and 10-term incumbent Congressman Joe Crowley in a June 26 New York contest rocked Washington.“We have a Democratic party that’s lurching far to the left,” said Representative Steve Stivers, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee. Michael Byerly, a spokesman for the Congressional Leadership Fund, another Republican group, predicted Democrats’ “ultra-progressive views” will be a hard sell with middle-class voters.Yet Ocasio-Cortez is only the most visible symbol of a grassroots insurgency that has sprung up across the country, including in spots far from deep-blue Democratic strongholds. Most embracing the progressive label share a disdain for corporate money in politics and favor more government-run healthcare, subsidies for college tuition and wage hikes for laborers.Progressives have a mixed record in early nominating contests, more often than not losing to more mainstream Democrats.But they have moved the party sharply to the left, particularly on expanding the government role in healthcare, a Reuters review of Democratic positions in the most competitive congressional races found.Across 41 battleground House of Representatives districts, two-thirds of Democratic nominees want to expand the government’s role in healthcare, the review shows. About a dozen support “Medicare for All,” for many a reference to a single-payer system that would largely replace private insurance. In Congress, most House Democrats support a Medicare for All bill, with six members of the Blue Dog caucus of fiscally conservative Democrats signing on as co-sponsors.Much of the progressive movement has its roots in the nationwide volunteer network built by Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential run. Several groups that sprang from the failed Sanders campaign are now pushing for progressive candidates in the midterms – including Brand New Congress, formed two years ago on the dream of running hundreds of progressive political newcomers to oust establishment incumbents, Democrats and Republicans alike.In some ways, the splintering in the Democratic Party is simply a new round in the 2016 fight between Clinton and Sanders supporters. Progressive insurgents believe Clinton’s defeat, on top of losing control of Congress and most state governments, proved them right. They aspire to overthrow conventional wisdom that Democrats must stay safely in the middle to compete.“Democrats have been fixated for 20 years on this elusive, independent, mythical middle of the road voter that did not exist,” said Crystal Rhoades, head of the Democratic Party in Nebraska’s Douglas County, where a progressive candidate, Kara Eastman, is trying to wrest a competitive congressional district from a Republican.“We’re going to try bold ideas.”THE MOVEMENT’S BEGINNINGSThe push for a progressive takeover of Congress began long before Trump won office.One audacious plan began to take hold in early 2016, as a crew of organizers for Sanders’ presidential campaign traveled the country, staging revival-style rallies.The crew included Zack Exley, a veteran political and tech consultant who cut his teeth as an organizer in union fights in Detroit; Saikat Chakrabarti, a technology consultant who started as a volunteer in an online group called Coders for Sanders; Alexandra Rojas, a just-turned 21-year-old college student who was working three jobs; and Corbin Trent, who was selling gourmet burgers in Morristown, Tennessee.“I asked the wife if I could sell the food truck and go to work for Bernie,” Trent said. A month and a half later, he was hired on.When it became clear Sanders would lose, supporters shifted to a new mission. “What if we could do exactly the same thing, not only for president, but Congress, all at once?” asked Chakrabarti.Brand New Congress was launched in April 2016 with a goal of recruiting 400 candidates, all political outsiders with a record of community activism who would run on a single populist platform. Scornful of the Democratic Party hierarchy and the influence of big-money donors, the founders vowed to stay independent of any party – even if it meant finding progressives willing to run as Republicans.“We have to think big or go home,” said Isra Allison, a Sanders volunteer from Charlotte, North Carolina.They toured the country and put out a call for nominations of candidates; more than 10,000 poured in.One name that surfaced: Ocasio-Cortez, a bartender from the Bronx nominated by her brother. Allison called her the day after Christmas, and a couple months later Exley and Chakrabarti met the fledgling candidate over a Thai dinner in lower Manhattan.“I wasn’t sure what to make of her,” Chakrabarti said. “She was too articulate, I think is exactly what I told Zack.” But the advocates quickly realized they were sharing a meal with a potential game-changer.They looked for others. At weekend “boot camps,” candidates were coached in the basics of electioneering, and thrashed out a platform including Medicare for All, a $15 per hour minimum wage and free college tuition. Another bold idea, to abolish US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ICE, surfaced at a Brand New Congress event in 2017.Soon the group was swamped by the challenge of vetting so many candidates – and convincing promising aspirants they could win.There were other problems. After Trump’s polarizing election, the notion that progressives could transcend partisan politics faded, and Brand New Congress began to struggle with fundraising. The group was told it couldn’t use ActBlue, the popular Democratic fundraising platform, if it backed candidates running as Republicans, Trent said.“It was like pushing a rock up a hill,” Trent said.Many of the original BNC people, including Exley, Trent, Chakrabarti and Rojas, abandoned the nonpartisan idea to join Justice Democrats, formed in early 2017 with a mission to rebuild the party to align with a progressive agenda. Others stayed behind at the BNC. “I didn’t want to work with any organization that had a political affiliation,” said Allison.The two organizations tried sharing a political action committee, but separated entirely last October. Trent and Chakrabarti now work for Ocasio-Cortez’ campaign.Overall, Justice Democrats endorsed 68 House candidates, including some originally recruited by the BNC: 21 won primaries or made it to the general election, 37 lost, two dropped out and eight are in races yet to be decided.Still, the BNC founders cite the Ocasio-Cortez breakthrough as a sign of what is possible.“I think now when we approach people for 2020, they’re going to think we’re a little less nuts,” Trent said.MULTIPLE MOVEMENTSBrand New Congress and Justice Democrats are just two players in a movement where different groups with different agendas jostle for donations and influence in the midterms. Some, like Democracy for America and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, were in place years before the Sanders campaign.California billionaire Tom Steyer, the Democrats’ largest donor, has spent millions of his own money on NextGen America, a group that aims to mobilize young voters. The hedge-fund manager turned activist vows to build the largest progressive operation in America.“The overwhelming number of people whatever their particular affiliation – whether Republican or Democrat or independent – feel as if the political establishment is not hearing them,” he said. The result, he says, is low turnout – particularly by young people who lean toward Democrats.With his fiery calls to impeach Trump, Steyer is among the progressives butting heads with leaders of the Democratic Party’s establishment, who fear turning off moderate voters.This year, progressives have complained about the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which recruits candidates, fundraises and helps plan campaigns for Democrats vying for House seats. In some competitive districts, the DCCC has intervened to back more centrist candidates, ones they consider more electable.The DCCC focuses on finding candidates with records that fit their districts, a spokeswoman said. “The DCCC has long valued the unprecedented influence that the grassroots have in these races,” said communications director Meredith Kelly.Leon Panetta, who served 16 years in Congress and then as a top official in the Clinton and Obama administrations, said Democrats are “going through turmoil” trying to settle on a vision.“Very frankly, it’s a party of a lot of very different voices right now,” Panetta said.Others downplay the notion of a civil war. Elaine Kamarck, among the founders of the New Democrat movement that helped move the party away from liberal policies in the 1990s, now analyzes the midterms as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She found most primaries in competitive districts were captured by centrist candidates.Kamarck, who also served as a super delegate for Clinton in 2016, says Democrats need to appeal to moderate voters if they hope to retake Congress. She calls the idea that unabashed progressivism can win in Republican-tilting districts the political equivalent of “repealing the laws of physics.”“I find myself doing a lot of eye-rolling,” she said. “There’s always the argument in the Democratic Party, if only we had really liberal candidates, we would do better. It has never been true before.”Could this year be different? “We’ll see.”THE RACE IN NEBRASKAOne race that may help answer the question is in Omaha, where Eastman will try to unseat a Republican incumbent, Don Bacon, in a district with 13,000 more Republicans than Democrats.Unlike the rest of deeply Republican Nebraska, though, Democrats have been able to win in this district, which stretches from the gentrifying neighborhoods of Omaha, now attracting a surge of millennials, to conservative-leaning suburban neighborhoods near Offutt Air Force Base, where Bacon once served as commanding officer. Obama narrowly won the district in 2008; Trump took it by two points in 2016.Eastman, a nonprofit executive, was considered by the party establishment as far too liberal for Nebraska. She supported a single-payer healthcare system that would replace private insurance, and a list of other progressive causes: tough gun rules, support for abortion rights, a $15 minimum wage.Democratic state and national party leaders mostly lined up behind Brad Ashford, a moderate one-time Republican who already represented the district for one term. Thanks in part to backing from the DCCC and other national groups, Ashford had far more money.The Eastman campaign said it knocked on 60,000 doors. On 15 May, she won by 3 percentage points. After the primary, the DCCC added her to its “Red to Blue” list, along with other progressives who beat establishment candidates.Seeking to pummel Eastman, the Congressional Leadership Fund, a group working in swing districts to protect the GOP majority, has opened a field office in Omaha and already purchased $1.6 million worth of ads, while the Republican National Committee calls her an “out of touch, single-payer touting radical.” One CLF ad chides Eastman for her teenage membership in a band with an obscene name – Pieces of Fuck.Eastman’s positions “might work in some districts in California, but it’s not representative of Nebraska 2,” said Courtney Alexander, CLF communications director.Eastman says Omaha voters are not scared by “pragmatic and common-sense” ideas to remake the healthcare system. She believes the key to winning districts like hers is inspiring more Democrats to turn out – not running as a “Republican-light” moderate.“When they lose, we say, ‘See? Democrats can’t win here,’ ” she said. “We have to get people inspired to vote, and just running against Donald Trump is not enough.”THE FIGHT IN MIAMIThe same debate is playing out this summer in South Florida, where the progressive insurgency has touched off a raucous fight between Democratic hopefuls in Florida’s Congressional District 27, which includes trendy Miami Beach, affluent Coral Gables and Little Havana’s Hispanic immigrants.Represented for three decades by a retiring Cuban-American Republican, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the district favored Hillary Clinton by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016. It’s considered perhaps the easiest takeover target for Democrats in the country, though nine Republicans are running, including former Miami-Dade County Commissioner Bruno Barreiro and television journalist Maria Elvira Salazar.Four Democrats have challenged Shalala in the August 28 primary. One, David Richardson, has attacked Shalala as a “corporate” Democrat who “sold out progressive values,” running ads slamming her for serving on the board of UnitedHealth Group and for once telling a comedian she opposed universal healthcare. Shalala says it was a joke.A state representative, Richardson has won the endorsement of progressive groups including Our Revolution 305 in Miami and the Congressional Progressive Caucus – caucus co-chair Wisconsin Representative Mark Pocan campaigned with him Friday – and boasts of raising more than $900,000 in small-dollar donations. Progressive support has helped him match Shalala in fundraising – although both are wealthy and each pumped $500,000 into their campaigns.Matt Haggman, a former Miami Herald reporter who also is running, broadcast a TV commercial calling for the abolishment of ICE, the federal agency under fire for separating immigrant children from their parents on the US-Mexico border. “This is a moment when our politics are fundamentally broken, and this must be a moment of renewal,” he said.That idea has begun to catch on with Democratic voters across the country, who are now evenly split on whether to abolish the border control agency formed after the September 11, 2001, attacks, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. The same poll shows how the idea of expanding Medicare has won wide support among Democratic voters – and even many Republicans.The Democrats’ best-known contender is Shalala, the former University of Miami president who once ran the Clinton Foundation. Some voters say they view her establishment ties with suspicion.“I am definitely looking for more of a new guard,” said Scott Silverman, a 37-year-old actuary who met Haggman during a canvassing session in Palmetto Bay, a neighborhood of spacious ranch homes with lush yards and the occasional peacock in the road.Silverman blames the party’s leaders for Trump. “The fact that they couldn’t beat him says something about the establishment of the Democratic Party.”The first Democrat to enter the race was Michael Hepburn, another of the original candidates recruited by Brand New Congress. Hepburn left his job as a college adviser to campaign full time. He hoped to raise money together with his fellow candidates, but that idea didn’t work out, and his latest campaign report showed him down to his last $434. Most days, he takes public transportation to working-class neighborhoods to knock on doors. During a recent debate, he donned boxing gloves.“Everybody sounds bold. Everybody sounds progressive now,” Hepburn said.Even Shalala is claiming the label, calling herself a “pragmatic progressive.” She said she supports a version of “Medicare for All,” allowing people of all ages the option to buy into an improved model of the government program currently available to older Americans, or keep private insurance. The idea would have seemed a liberal pipe dream in the 1990s, when she helped lead Clinton’s doomed effort to pass healthcare reform.“I’m just pragmatic, because I have run a health care system and because I have seen politics at the national level,” she said. “It doesn’t mean that I am not a progressive or don’t want to see the system evolve. … But we have to get there.”last_img read more

A Small Town In Texas Is Home To One Of The Last

first_img Share Bill Zeeble/KERAThe Nokona baseball glove factory in the small town of Nocona, Texas, is one of the only remaining baseball glove factories in the U.S.About 100 miles northwest of Dallas-Fort Worth, past pastures of crops and cattle, sits Nocona, Texas, population 3,000, home to the Nokona baseball glove factory, one of the only baseball glove factories left in the United States.Inside, there are stacks of tanned and dyed kangaroo, buffalo and calfskins piled at one end of the 20,000-square-foot one-story shop. “We literally bring leather in through one door and magically, ball gloves come out the door at the very end,” says Rob Storey, Nokona’s executive vice president.“That, and about 45 labor operations, and you’ve got a ball glove.”Storey should know — this is the family business. To survive the depression, his grandfather, Bob Storey, added baseball gloves to the family’s line of leather goods in 1934. Since then, just about every U.S. competitor has moved production overseas.Grandfather Bob, who died in 1980, said he’d rather quit and go fishing than import Nokonas.Rob Storey says, these days, being the nation’s only baseball glove maker in continuous operation for 85 years gives Nokona a competitive advantage: “Because we have people that understand the game of baseball. Our competitors are making them in factories. [In] a lot of those factories, people have never even seen a baseball game or know what it is. Sure, it would be easy to go over there and do something. But that’s not who we are. We’re not about easy.”Nokona and its seventy-five employees make, market and sell their mostly handmade gloves in the town with same name. The brand honors Comanche chief Peta Nocona. The company couldn’t legally use the city’s spelling, so Storey’s grandfather changed the “c” to a “k,” and it’s been spelled that way ever since.At about the midway spot on the factory floor, Martin Gomez is busy turning gloves, something he’s done for 19 years. It’s a big deal because every glove is first sewn inside-out, and Gomez is considered a master.Bill Zeeble/KERAMartin Gomez has worked at Nokona for 19 years. He is considered a master at making these baseball gloves.“It’s not that hard,” says Gomez. “It takes time to learn, to get used to. Like the first time you start to work, it gave me a blister all over my hands, but you get used to it.”Storey says Gomez is modest. If he’s not careful, he can tear the leather and hand-stitching. Fast, practiced, yet efficient, Gomez slides a rod in each inside-out finger, pushes it hard against a wooden dowel and turns each leather finger back the right way.First, he sprays leather softener on the inside-out glove. Then, says Storey, he heats it on a 250-degree metal form.“It’s very critical to do that,” says Storey, “so that you don’t rip out any of the seams while we’re going through this process, because this process in some ways is more difficult on the glove than the game of baseball.”The game of baseball, after all, is what Nokonas are all about, even if the brand is not nearly as well-known as sporting goods giants like Rawlings or Wilson. In the youth market though, it’s big.“I grew up using a Nokona glove,” recalls major league pitcher Robby Scott. “My first glove that I ever really remember was a first baseman’s mitt that was a Nokona.”We first talked to Arizona relief pitcher Scott when he was with the Red Sox between World Series games — the Sox would go on to win the series. Scott says there’s just something special about Nokona: “I will never wear a different glove,” he says. “It’s a special bond I have with them. They could have 200 players wearing their gloves. But to me it seems special because they make it seem like I’m the only one.”And, says Rob Storey, Nokona is the only maker he knows of that will refurbish its old, tattered mitts.He says that doesn’t happen with gloves made overseas.Copyright 2019 KERA. To see more, visit KERA.last_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Wed May 31 MondayFriday from

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uThe latest racially motivated attack by a knife wielding White supremacist happened in Portland, Oregon, a city and state with a long history of racist violence against people of color. We’ll discuss the increase in racist attacks in America since Donald Trump’s ascendancy to the White House, with Ryan Lenz, senior investigative reporter for the Intelligence Project, published by the Southern Poverty Law Center. Also, the Mod Squad, Taya Graham and Stephen Janis of The Real News Network report on law enforcement and politics.These stories and much more on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes, Monday through Friday, 5-7 p.m.last_img