Another iPhone Vulnerability: Access iOS Backups Data with iPhone Password Breaker (Updated)

first_imgRelated Posts Tags:#enterprise#mobile#news#Products 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… klint finleycenter_img Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Russian computer forensics software company ElcomSoft offers a product called iPhone Password Breaker that enables uses to access backup data from iOS devices. Today the company announced an update to the software that enables users to crack iOS 4 keychains – which may include e-mail and other passwords – without altering the phone’s content. ElcomSoft claims to be the first company to be able to crack keychain passwords. According to the company’s press release, “Prior to the release of the updated iPhone Password Breaker, the keychains were considered impossible to obtain.”iOS 3 devices used hardware encryption unique to each individual device to encrypt keychains, even when the keychains were exported to an external device. Apparently, this is not the case in iOS4. The keychains can be unlocked with only the backup password, which iPhone Password Breaker can recover. If an online backup has not been performed, the keychains aren’t accessible.Enterprises using iPhones may wish to avoid the use of offline backups until Apple fixes the issue.iPhone Password Breaker uses ATI and NVIDIA video acceleration hardware to recover backup passwords faster than traditional CPU-only approaches. ElcomSoft uses the same technology in its other products for recovering passwords from a variety of software, but does not offer any other products specifically designed for recovering smart phone passwords. According to ElcomSoft, the company’s tools are used by most of the Fortune 500, various branches of the military and many governments.Update: ElcomSoft CEO Vladimir Katalov wrote us to say:To be honest, I would not call that a “vulnerability”. If Apple wants to have an ability to restore from backup to another/new device, there is no solution, i.e. keychain cannot be encrypted based on hardware keys anymore. So we have to choose between security and usability, as always 🙂 The only recommendation is to select long and complex passwords to backups.last_img read more

Creating Tables In Figma

first_img Here’s a Figma table mockup that you can use for learning purposes — let the creativity begin! HomeWeb DesignCreating Tables In Figma I added tables in the mockup file that were made in a few different ways:Using this tutorial (separate components for cells’ styles);Using the cell component (components for borders, background, and content);Using the cell component that unites everything (with only content components in addition).Try to play around and change the cell’s styles.Changing the state of the row. (Large preview)ConclusionIf you’re using the same components library in several projects and you’ve got a reasonable number of tables in each of them, you can create a local copy of components (cells components with stroke styles and, if needed, cells components with different states), customize them, and use them in the project. The cell content can be set based on local components.Also, if you’re using the table for one large project with different kinds of tables, all the above-mentioned components are easily scaled. The table components can be improved to infinity and beyond, like creating the cell states when hovering and other kinds of interactions.Questions, feedback, thoughts? Leave a comment below, and I’ll do my best to help you!Figma Table Mockup DownloadAs promised, I created a complete version of the Figma table mockup that you’re welcome to use for learning purposes or anything else you like. Enjoy! Content components can be created gradually: start with the basic ones like text components and add new ones as the project grows in size.The reason we want the content to be in components is the same as with other elements — it saves uptime. To change the cell’s content, we just need to switch it in the component.Editing the table using cells components (Large preview)Creating A Cell ComponentWe created all the atoms we need: background, border, content. It’s time to create a cell component, i.e. the molecule made from atoms. Let’s gather all the components in a cell. The top row is for the cells on top and in the middle of the table. The bottom row is only for the cells at the bottom. This way we’ll be able to put the cells one after another with no gaps and keep the same stroke width.A few examples: If the table design considers the absence of vertical borders, cells 2 and 6 would be enough. (Large preview) Creating Tables In Figma The cell component (the ‘molecule’) (Large preview) The Background Component (the ‘atom’) (Large preview) A border component with 1px stroke (Large preview) The cells’ states (hover and selected) (Large preview) (mb, yk, il) Posted on 25th September 2019Web Design FacebookshareTwittertweetGoogle+share Creating Tables In FigmaSasha Belichenko 2019-09-25T12:30:59+02:00 2019-09-25T12:35:34+00:00 If your project has several styles for table borders (a few border examples shown below), you should create a separate component for each style. Simply create a new master component as we did before and customize it the way you need. Set the background component as the bottom layer and stretch it to the whole cell size (set constraints to “Left & Right” and “Top & Bottom”).Add the border component with the same constraints as the background component.Now to the most complicated part — the content content.The cell has paddings, so you need to make a frame with the component’s content. That frame should be stretched to the whole cell size except for the paddings. The content component should also be stretched to the whole frame size. The content itself needs to be deprived of any margins, so all paddings will be set by the cell.At the end of the day, cell paddings are the only property in a component that we will set only once without an opportunity to change it later. In the example above, I made it 4px for all sides.Note: As a fix, you can create columns with empty cells (with no content and width of 16px for example) left and right to the column where extra margin is needed. Or if your table’s design allows, you can add horizontal paddings inside the cell component. For example, cells in Google Material Design have 16px paddings by default.Don’t forget to remove the “Clip content” option for the cell and frame (this can be done at the right-hand panel in the Properties section). The cell’s content can go out of its borders; for example, when a dropdown is inside your cell and you want to show its state with a popup.Note: We’ll be using this cell style as the main one. Don’t worry if your table has additional styles — we’ll cover that in the Table States and Components, Not Overrides sections.Cell Options For A Standard TableThis step could be optional but if your table needs states then you can’t go without it. And even more so if there is more than one border style in the table.So let’s create additional cell components from which it’d be easier to build up a table. When working with a table, we will select the appropriate component depending on its position in the table (e.g. depending on the type of borders).In order to do that, let’s take our cell component and create eight more masters from it. We also need to disable the appropriate layers responsible for borders. The result should look like the image below. In this tutorial, we will talk about how tables can be created in Figma by using components and Atomic Design methodology. We will also take a look at the basic elements of the table layout and how components can be included in the component library so that they can become part of the design system you are using.To make it easy for you, I’ve prepared a mockup example that uses all of the components we need for this tutorial.To follow along, you will need to have at least some understanding of the basic Figma concepts, its interface, and how to work with Figma components. However, if you’re new to Figma and working with table data, I recommend watching the “Getting Started” video to help you better understand Figma end-to-end, as well as the article “How To Architect A Complex Web Table” that was published not too long ago here on Smashing Magazine.To simplify the scope of this tutorial, let’s assume that the colors, fonts, and effects already exist as styles in the Figma project you’re about to begin. In terms of Atomic Design, they are atoms. (To learn more, the folks at littleBits wrote a great article on the topic.)The target audience for this tutorial are designers (UX, UI) who have either already adopted Figma into their workflows or are planning to try Figma in their next design projects but aren’t sure how to get started.So, without further ado, let’s dig in!Quick Note: While writing this article, Figma introduced plugins. At the time of publishing, there weren’t any good ones for working with tables, but things might change fast. Who knows, maybe this article will actually help an aspiring Figma plugin developer to create a really neat Figma Tables plugin, or at least, I hope it will. 😉IntroductionImagine the table as an organism. The table cell is then a molecule which is comprised of individual atoms. In design terms, they’re cell properties.So, let’s start with the cell. It has three properties:BackgroundBorderContentNow we’ll take a closer look at each one of them.BackgroundThe background will be a separate component in Figma. The size doesn’t really matter since we can stretch the component as we need, but let’s begin with setting the size to 100×36 pixels.In this component, add a rectangle of the same size as the component itself. It will be the only object inside the component. We need to attach the rectangle’s borders to the component’s borders by using constraints (set constraints to “Left & Right” and “Top & Bottom” at the right panel in the Constraints section), so that the rectangle stretches automatically to the size of the component.If you’d like to see this in action, watch this tutorial on how the constraints work in Figma. Creating Tables In FigmaYou are here: Related postsInclusive Components: Book Reviews And Accessibility Resources13th December 2019Should Your Portfolio Site Be A PWA?12th December 2019Building A CSS Layout: Live Stream With Rachel Andrew10th December 2019Struggling To Get A Handle On Traffic Surges10th December 2019How To Design Profitable Sales Funnels On Mobile6th December 2019How To Build A Real-Time Multiplayer Virtual Reality Game (Part 2)5th December 2019 From our sponsors: Creating Tables In Figma Note: For each border style created above, it’d be good to add master components like the ones described earlier.So we have excluded the necessity of overriding cell’s instances (disabling the appropriate layers, to be precise). Instead of that, we use various components. Now if, for example, a column uses a different style from the default (the fill color or border), you can choose this column and simply change the relative component. And everything will be alright. On the opposite side, changing a border of each cell manually (disabling the appropriate borders) is a pain you don’t want to bother with.Now we are ready to create tables (in terms of Atomic Design — organisms) from the various cell components (molecules) we made.Customizing The TableChanging the row’s height in the whole table is relatively easy: highlight the table, change the element height (in this case, the cell’s height, H in the right-hand panel in the Properties section), and then change the vertical margin from the element to 0. That’s it: changing the line height took two clicks!Changing the row height for the whole table (Large preview)Changing the column width: highlight the column and change the width size. After moving the rest of the table close up, select the whole table by using the Tide Up option in the Alignment panel as well as the first item in the dropdown list under the rightmost icon.Changing the column width. (Large preview)Note: I wouldn’t recommend grouping rows and columns. If you change the column size extending the elements, you’ll get fractional values for width and height. If you don’t group them and snap to the pixel grid, the cell size will remain an integer number.The background color, stroke type, and content data can be changed in the appropriate component or in one of the eight cells master components (cells that had different stroke styles). The only parameter that can’t be changed right away is the cell margins, e.g. content paddings. The rest are easily customizable.Components, Not OverridesLooking at what we got in the end, it might seem like overkill. And it is if there is only one table in your project. In this case, you can simply create one cell component and leave the background and stroke components off. Simply include them in the cell component, create the table and do the necessary customization for each separate cell.But if components are included in a library that is used by a number of other files, here comes the most interesting stuff.Note: *I do not recommend changing the background color and stroke in components’ instances. Change them only in the master. By doing so, those instances with overrides won’t get updated. This means you would have to do that manually and that’s what we’re trying to avoid. So let’s stick to the master components.*If we need to create an additional type of table cells (e.g. the table header), we add the necessary set of master components for cells with the appropriate styles (just like we did above with the eight cells that had different stroke styles), and use it. Yes, it takes longer than overriding components’ instances but this way you will avoid the case when changing the masters will apply those changes to all layouts.Table StatesLet’s talk about the states of the table’s elements. A cell can have three states: default, hover, and selected. Same for columns and rows.If your project is relatively small, all states can be set by overrides inside instances of your table components. But if it’s a big one, and you’d want to be able to change the look of the states in the future, you’ll have to create separate components for everything.You’ll need to add all eight cells with different stroke variants for each of the states (maybe less, depends on the stroke style). And yes, we’ll need separate components for the background color and the stroke for the states as well.In the end, it’ll look similar to this: If each cell in the table has a border, we’d only need cells 1, 4, 5 and 8. (Large preview) Here’s where a bit of trouble comes in. Unfortunately, if we do everything as described above (when changing the component’s state from one to another), there is a risk of losing the cell’s content. We’ll have to update it apart from the case when the content type is the same as in the master cell. At this point, we can’t do anything about it. The fill color of the rectangle will determine the background color of the cell. Let’s pick the white color for it. I recommend choosing that color from the color styles that are configured at the beginning of the project.Changing the background color (Large preview)BorderThis one is a bit trickier than the background. You can’t just create one rectangle with a stroke. We may need different kinds of borders: one for the separate cells (with borders around), one for the whole row of cells with only top and bottom borders, or one for the table header that we might want to separate from the rest with a wider line. There are many options.Border properties:Border line (left, right, top, bottom, or absence of any of them)Line widthLine colorLine styleEach line within the cell border might havea different width, color, and style. For example, the left one could be a continuous red line, and the top one a dotted grey line.Let’s create a component with a size of 100×36 pixels (the same as we did before). Inside the component, we need to add 4 lines for each border. Now pay attention to how we are going to do this.Add a line for the bottom border with the length of the component width;Set its position to the bottom border and constraints to stretch horizontally and stick to the bottom border;For the top border, duplicate the line for the bottom border, rotate it by 180 degrees and stick to the top of the component. (Don’t forget to change its constraints to stick to the top and stretch horizontally.);Next, for the left border, simply rotate by -90 degrees and set its position and constraints to be at the left side sticking to the left border and stretching vertically;Last but not least, you can create the right border by rotating it by 90 degrees and setting its position and constraints. Set stroke color and stroke width for each line to gray (select from the color styles) and 1 pixel respectively.Note: You may be asking yourself why we rotated the line for the bottom border. Well, when you change the stroke width for a line in Figma, it will rise. So we had to set this “rise” direction to the center of the component. Changing the line’s stroke width (in our case it is the border size) won’t expand outside the component (cell).Now we can hide or customize the styles separately for every border in the cell. Examples of cell content in components. This is not a complete list; you can use most of the components of your design system inside a table. (Large preview) The separate stroke component will save up lots of your time and add scalability. If you change the stroke color inside the master component, the whole table will adjust. Same as with the background color above, each individual cell can have its own stroke parameters.Changing border’s width and color (Large preview)ContentThis is the most complex component of all.We need to create all possible variations of the table content in the project: plain text, a text with an icon (left or right, different alignment), checkboxes, switches, and any other content that a cell may possibly contain. To simplify this tutorial, please check the components in the mockup file. How to create and organize components in Figma is a topic for another article.However, there are a few requirements for content components:Components should stretch easily both vertically and horizontally to fit inside a cell;The minimum size of the component should be less than the default cell size (especially height, keep in mind possible cell paddings);Avoid any margins, so the components can align properly inside a cell;Avoid unnecessary backgrounds because a cell itself has it already. If there are merged cells or border absence, we must apply the rest 2 and 3 cells as well as 6 and 7 to the bottom row. (Large preview) The cell options we need to build a table. Note that there could be a few extra depending on your table borders styles. (Large preview) A few extra examples of border styles. Note that the white background is not included in the component. (Large preview) Related Reading“Atomic Design,” Brad Frost“How To Architect A Complex Web Table,” Slava Shestopalov, Smashing Magazine“Creating Atomic Components In Figma,” Design & Engineering team, littleBits“Figma Tables: Data Grid Design By A Single Cell-Component,” Roman Kamushken, SetproductUseful ResourcesFigma YouTube ChannelThe official Figma channel on YouTube — it’s the first thing to watch if you are new to Figma.Google Sheets SyncA Figma plugin that helps you get data from Google Sheets into your Figma file. This should work fine with the techniques from this tutoria, but you’ll need to invest some time into renaming all the text layers for this to work properly. Table with various rows’ states. (Large preview)last_img read more

Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews

first_img Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press By David MalakoffJul. 31, 2018 , 6:20 PM The long wait for a White House science adviser is over. President Donald Trump announced today that he intends to nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier, a university administrator and former vice-chair of the governing board of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), to be director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The OSTP director traditionally, but not always, also holds the title of the president’s science adviser.The move caps a search process of record-setting length—nearly 560 days, double the longest time taken by any other modern president to name an OSTP director. Many in the research community had lamented the delay. But the wait may have been worth it: Droegemeier, a respected veteran of the Washington, D.C., policymaking scene, is getting positive reviews from science and university groups.“He’s a very good pick. … He has experience speaking science to power,” says environmental policy expert John Holdren, who served as science adviser under former President Barack Obama and is now at Harvard University. “I expect he’ll be energetic in defending the R&D budget and climate change research in particular.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img Kelvin Droegemeier Maria Zuber, a planetary geophysicist and vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agrees that Droegemeier will stand up for climate science. “He always has. I see no reason why he wouldn’t now.” But she says his style is not confrontational. “He’s a good old boy. He wears cowboy boots. … He’s a personable guy.” She adds that “he’s got solid conservative credentials,” noting that his web page is emblazoned with “God Bless America!!!”“He is an excellent choice,” says Tobin Smith, vice president for policy at the Association of American Universities in Washington, D.C. “He has a strong understanding of issues of concern to research universities.”“Kelvin is a solid scientist, excellent with people, and with deep experience with large bureaucracies,” says Cliff Mass, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “A moderate voice that won’t politicize the science.”Droegemeier, who has served on the faculty of The University of Oklahoma (OU) in Norman for 33 years and been the school’s vice president for research since 2009, has long been rumored to be in the running for the OSTP job, which entails advising the president on technical issues and overseeing coordination of federal science policy. He is no stranger to Washington, D.C.; then-President George W. Bush named him to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, in 2004, and Obama reappointed him in 2011. He served as the board’s vice-chair from 2014 to 2017.He has also served as a formal and informal adviser to federal and state politicians. He leads a state science advisory panel named by Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, and advised former Oklahoma Representative Jim Bridenstine (R), now the administrator of NASA. Recently, he helped craft federal legislation aimed at bolstering weather forecasting that Congress passed last year with bipartisan support. Those connections—as well as his links to David Boren, a former Democratic senator from Oklahoma who last month retired from the OU presidency—likely helped bring Droegemeier’s name to the attention of the Trump administration.A serious scientistDroegemeier, who is 59, earned his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois in Urbana in 1985. As a researcher, he focused on numerical weather forecasting, including studies of thunderstorm dynamics, and helped develop the use of supercomputers to run atmospheric models. He helped found and lead two NSF-funded centers: One focused on the analysis and prediction of storms, the other was a hub for “collaborative adaptive sensing of the atmosphere.” His most cited paper—with 1066 citations—described a “multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction model” and was published in 2000 in the journal Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics.“His command of both science and policy issues is nearly unmatched in the community,” says Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and president of the American Meteorological Society in Boston. Wakimoto says he has known Droegemeier since graduate school and predicts he will be “a superb spokesperson for the community.”“Kelvin is one of the most respected colleagues in the field of meteorology but also has the experience and savvy to interact at the highest policy levels,” adds Marshall Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Georgia in Athens and chair of NASA’s Earth Sciences Advisory Committee.Challenges aheadIf confirmed by the Senate, Droegemeier will take the helm of an office that has been buffeted by change and uncertainty. Under Obama, OSTP’s staff grew to some 135 people, and it was active in shaping budget and policy plans, particularly in the climate change arena. Under Trump, OSTP’s staff plummeted to about 35 last year but has since grown to about 60 under the leadership of its de facto head, OSTP Deputy Chief Technology Officer Michael Kratsios.Holdren says Droegemeier has “a big challenge ahead of him. … I look forward to seeing what he’s able to accomplish in a very challenging circumstance.” Trump has a reputation for ignoring expert advice. But “it could well be that [Droegemeier is] thinking: ‘Here’s a chance to make a small difference and to at least be a small voice of reason,’” says Rick Anthes, president emeritus of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.One of Droegemeier’s first tasks, Holdren says, will be to develop strong working relationships with other senior White House staff, including the head of the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the annual budget request to Congress. Thus far, Holdren believes Trump’s budget requests, which have called for large cuts in some science agencies, “reflect that weakness of not having a senior scientist engaged as an equal in that process.” Another task, Holdren believes, will be “rebuilding the science part” of OSTP, which under Trump has emphasized technology and workforce issues.“Having such a strong leader. … as head of OSTP is essential to ensuring science is a key factor considered in the policymaking process,” says Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities in Washington, D.C. “All Americans are better off when science has a seat at the table.”Mostly, researchers are relieved that science will finally have some voice in the White House. “I wish it had happened a lot earlier,” Holdren says. “But on the other hand, many of us weren’t sure it would ever happen.”With reporting by Adrian Cho, Eric Hand, Jocelyn Kaiser, and Paul Voosen.last_img read more

German Grand Prix cut from 2015 Formula One calendar

first_imgThe German Grand Prix was cut from the 2015 Formula One calendar on Friday after neither of the country’s two circuits was able to make a deal with series promoter Bernie Ecclestone. The World Motor Sport Council said in a statement on Friday that the race was withdrawn because the commercial rights holder “and promoter did not reach agreement.”The German Grand Prix, one of the most historic in the calendar that was first held in 1926, had been set for July 19. The last time the German Grand Prix was scratched from the calendar was in 1955.With the two circuits alternating annually, Nuerburgring was scheduled to stage the race, but because it has financial problems, Hockenheim had been considered a replacement. The failure to reach a deal means there will now be 19 races this season instead of 20, with a three-week interval between the British Grand Prix on July 5 and the Hungarian race on July 26.The German race has been losing spectators steadily since the days of seven-time champion Michael Schumacher, even though Germany is home to Mercedes, the car maker behind the top team last season, and driver Nico Rosberg. Four-time champion Sebastian Vettel, who now drives for Ferrari, is also German.Nuerburgring circuit spokesman Pietro Nuvolini said earlier that there was still no agreement with Ecclestone while Hockenheim officials announced that the facility would be unable to organize the race within the time remaining.Nuerburgring officials had been asking Ecclestone to take a cut in his fee for staging the race. The fee is reportedly $15 million. Mercedes had offered a “significant” amount to Hockenheim to help in saving the race but the offer was not taken, according to the German constructor.advertisementlast_img read more

J.W. Walsh on Mason Rudolph’s Game-Winning Drives: ‘That’s Who He Is’

first_imgWe’ve gone over how terrific those last few drives against Kansas State were for the Cowboys last Saturday. In fact, you’re probably sick of how much we’ve gone over that.One more thing, though.QB2 made a note of pumping QB1 to the Oklahoman after last week’s game.“That’s just who he is,” J.W. Walsh said about Mason Rudolph. “He embraces that moment.”It reminded of something I tweeted during the PGA Championship about Jordan Spieth when Spieth was in the midst of a back-nine 30 on Saturday to get within striking distance of Jason Day.As I sat there watching him summons a nine-hole score he had to have to have a shot, I thought, “this is who he is … this is what he does.”Same thing with Rudolph. Some people just have it. He’s talented, yes, but he’s got that thing that more talented guys would give up many attributes for. You can see it. His teammates can taste it.As for Walsh, he’s become as integral a part of OSU’s offense as starter not named Rudolph. OSU was egregious in TD percentage inside the red zone last season (50 percent — 109th in the nation). They still aren’t great (58 percent — 77th) but because of Walsh, they’ve become better. And they have a go to offense inside the five yard line.Mike Gundy spoke on that on Monday.“I want him to do more. There’s a bigger package for him. I wish he could be in there more because he deserves to be in there…I want to let him do more but I don’t want to disrupt the flow Mason has with the game.”If you’re looking for the comments section, it has moved to our forum, The Chamber. You can go there to comment and holler about these articles, specifically in these threads. You can register for a free account right here and will need one to comment.If you’re wondering why we decided to do this, we wrote about that here. Thank you and cheers!last_img read more