Cutest Disney Bag Ever

first_imgPhotos: Christina HarrisonIs this bag on your must-buy list? Let us know in the comments. Share This!Like Julia, I’m a big fan of the Disney-themed accessories from Loungefly. They’re less expensive that the Dooney & Bourke bags and more weather resistant than many of the Vera Bradley bags.This new Loungefly pattern that’s shown up in the parks and on shopDisney.com is an instant classic. We found ours in the jewelry shop on Main Street in the Magic Kingdom, but they should be available in many locations.It’s like they cutified all the best Disney icons (Dole Whip, turkey legs, Mickey & Minnie, balloons, it’s a small world, Space Mountain, Dumbo, Big Al!, and more) and then placed them on the most lovely field of teal.The pattern is available in a backpack style ($75) or as a wallet ($50). Both are lined in a darling teal and white stripe.last_img read more

How to Quickly Embed a Twitter Timeline on Your Website

first_imgSummaryRather than using a third-party service or plugin, Twitter makes it straightforward to add a Twitter timeline to your site in five quick steps. I’ve used plugins in the past to add a timeline to WordPress sites, the Twitter publish tool is so much easier. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedHow I’m Migrating My Storify StoriesWhen Storify announced in late 2017 they were closing down, I wasn’t too surprised. I had been an early adopter of Storify, using it to curate events, talks, and conferences since 2011. Storify had a drag-and-drop interface that made it easy to add tweets, Flickr photos, posts, and other online…In “Blogging”10 Ways to Improve Accessibility on Websites and Social MediaWhen I chatted about accessibility with other attendees at WordCamp Denver 2018 this weekend, I shared some of my tips and blog posts on how they could improve accessibility on their websites. After one conversation, they thanked me for the recommendations, and asked if I had a summary post that…In “Accessibility”5 Tips for Promoting Your Website LocallyAfter months of planning and hard work, you’re thrilled to launch your website. Your web designer created a great-looking site that’s easy to use and works well on desktop and mobile. Your site’s been submitted to search engines, Google Analytics installed, and Google Webmaster Tools set up. You’re not ready…In “Web design” In the past, adding a Twitter timeline to your website required you to log in to your Twitter account and connect it/provide permissions to a third-party plugin or service that provided the special code to add to your site.Or you would log into your Twitter account to create a widget to add to your site. And hope that the code provided would work on your site. Neither option worked well if you were a designer or developer creating a site for a client. You needed to walk your client through the steps to get the information. Or ask your client for their Twitter login credentials. Thankfully, Twitter has made it a lot easier to embed Twitter on your site.No more setting up a third-party service or logging into a Twitter account! Use Twitter Publish to Embed Twitter Timeline on Your WebsiteUsing the Twitter Publish tool, you can quickly get the embed code to add to your site. Here are the steps:Visit the Twitter Publish toolEnter the full URL for the timeline you want to embed. I entered my Twitter URL: https://twitter.com/redcrewSelect the display option you prefer: Embedded Timeline or Twitter Buttons. I selected Embedded Timeline.If you want, you can configure customization options for color, size, default link color, and language.The Twitter Publish tool displays the code you need to copy and paste into your site, along with a snapshot of how the timeline will display.last_img read more

Crowdsourcing Big Data Analytics Through Gamification

first_imgManaging the Changing IT Landscape: Creating Data Scientists The men’s college basketball tournament is a wild ride from start to finish—a notoriously unpredictable contest. I’m especially excited this year to watch the outcome because there’s money riding on it. Not a bet, but a cash prize for the best analytics model accurately predicting the winning teams during the tournament. I’m not referring to Warren Buffet’s prizeOpens in a new window either, but rather to March Machine Learning ManiaOpens in a new window, a competition sponsored by Intel on the Kaggle* platformOpens in a new window with a $15K award. A previous blog describes the predictive analytics competition in more detail. Unlike other bracket prediction contests or office pools that reward an individual’s predictions (dare I say guesses) for the outcome of the actual tournament, the March Machine Learning Mania contest focuses on creating the best analytics model that most accurately predicts the outcome of the tournament, regardless of who is playing. The goal here is to put science and technology behind the predictions to help make those guesses more accurate in the future. Cutting-edge data scienceI’m intrigued by Kaggle, a global community of data scientists that solves data problems in a competitive framework. Predictive analytics is by definition an inexact science. Based on the idea that there are multiple ways to develop a predictive model, Kaggle uses crowdsourcing and gamification to inspire “players” to work on specific problems. Scored and ranked throughout the competition, players have the opportunity to continuously improve their models. Ultimately the most effective one is developed by the winning player. Various levels of reward serve as incentives. Back in 2012, Harvard Business Review* magazine called the data scientist the sexiest job of the twenty-first centuryOpens in a new window. As companies seek to implement predictive analytics and big data solutions across their business, IT organizations are finding that there is a skill set shortage for data scientistsOpens in a new window. Competitions like March Machine Learning Mania serve to stimulate these skills, which will be critical for future business applications. The Kaggle draws community members from more than 100 countries and 200 universities who hone their skills playing in sponsored competitions. They are computer scientists, statisticians, data scientists, mathematicians, and physicists. Newbies are ranked by Kaggle as novices (just getting started with competitions). The widest group is classified as “Kagglers” (active competition participants). Top players achieve the rank of Masters by consistently providing stellar competition results. Like a top-ranking basketball player, these guys have skills.Kaggle offers companies a way to solve problems with analytics, especially organizations without in-house data science resources. But large companies are using the Kaggle platform to solve business problems as well. For example, Allstate is currently running the Purchase Prediction ChallengeOpens in a new window, and Walmart is running a Store Sales ForecastingOpens in a new window competition as a recruitment tool for filling its data scientist positions. Predictive analytics meets men’s basketballI’m excited about how the March Machine Learning Mania competition will turn out and what the results can tell us about the Kaggle platform as a model for effective IT-based data analytics for business. Here’s what we know so far: As of March 15, the last day to submit for the first stage of the March Machine Mania competition, Kaggle had received 1,866 submissions. Some 255 teams with 342 players developed analytics models to predict the NCAA tournament outcome based on historical data from the last five tournaments. A dynamic leaderboard ranking listed the final top 10 teams based on how effectively the submissions predict historical tournament outcomes. Congratulations to these awesome teams!The second half of the gameThis week kicked off the second stage of the competition—using the models to predict the outcome for the 2014 tournament. The solution file from the first stage plus data for the regular 2014 season results were provided to players to refine their submissions. New entries (not in the first-stage competition) were also allowed. Kaggle accepted entries from March 17 to March 19. Teams will be ranked against the tournament results as it progresses. I expect to see the leaderboards change as winning teams progress through the brackets. Tune into the Big Data DanceThis year, the NCAA tournament is more than fast plays, surprising upsets, and Cinderella teams. It’s a chance to see data analytics in action. While you’re watching the real games during the “Big Dance,” I’ll be right there with you, watching Kaggle’s “Big Data Dance” to see how predictive analytics play out on the basketball court. What’s your take on crowdsourcing big data analytics? I welcome your comments along with more intuitive predictions on the NCAA tournament.Chris Find Chris on LinkedIn.Start a conversation with Chris on Twitter.See previous content from Chris.#ITCenter #PredictiveAnalyticslast_img read more

U.S. to finalize new human subject protections

first_imgAfter 4 years of mulling, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is preparing to tighten rules designed to protect people who participate in research funded by the federal government and many private entities. HHS, along with 15 other agencies, released a Federal Register notice today describing the intended changes, which include tighter consent requirements for the reuse of stored blood or tissue in new research.The requirements, collectively known as the Common Rule, have been in place since 1991. But the expanding scale of research involving human subjects—enabled in part by more sophisticated ways to analyze biospecimens and by the large-scale collection of digital health records—has inspired an overhaul. In 2011, HHS announced plans to tighten the rules, and began collecting public feedback.The notice released today follows through on several ideas floated in that announcement. One major change would require researchers to get a participant’s consent to analyze donated biospecimens in future studies that are unrelated to the original research. For now, researchers can make use of stored samples leftover from previous studies or clinical tests without explicit consent by stripping them of any personal identifying information. That sidesteps the typical consent by “taking the human out of human subjects research,” says Kathy Hudson, deputy director for science, outreach, and policy at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland. But “that is not really consistent with the views we have about the partnership we have with research participants,” she adds. The new rule would “show respect” for these subjects, she says, by asking them to give broad consent to any unspecified future research use of their blood or tissue.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Another section aims to simplify the informed consent forms given to potential subjects in a study. The notice calls for making these long and complicated forms clearer by requiring a few essential components in the body of the form, and by relegating other details to an appendix.Not all of the revisions raise the ethical bar. Another set of changes would exempt eight categories of study from Common Rule requirements. The exempted research includes studies conducted as part of a public health surveillance effort and social science studies that involve collecting oral histories and biographies. Another simplifying measure would require that a research project spanning multiple institutions be consolidated under a single institutional review board.The move comes as NIH itself is gearing up for an ambitious bit of human subjects research—a longitudinal study of at least 1 million volunteers as part of the White House’s precision medicine initiative. Hudson says she expects the new rules will make it easier to make use of samples and data from that broad cohort as the study evolves.After the notice is officially published in the Federal Register next week, there will be a 90-day comment period before the release of a final rule.last_img read more

Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews

first_img Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press By David MalakoffJul. 31, 2018 , 6:20 PM The long wait for a White House science adviser is over. President Donald Trump announced today that he intends to nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier, a university administrator and former vice-chair of the governing board of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), to be director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The OSTP director traditionally, but not always, also holds the title of the president’s science adviser.The move caps a search process of record-setting length—nearly 560 days, double the longest time taken by any other modern president to name an OSTP director. Many in the research community had lamented the delay. But the wait may have been worth it: Droegemeier, a respected veteran of the Washington, D.C., policymaking scene, is getting positive reviews from science and university groups.“He’s a very good pick. … He has experience speaking science to power,” says environmental policy expert John Holdren, who served as science adviser under former President Barack Obama and is now at Harvard University. “I expect he’ll be energetic in defending the R&D budget and climate change research in particular.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img Kelvin Droegemeier Maria Zuber, a planetary geophysicist and vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agrees that Droegemeier will stand up for climate science. “He always has. I see no reason why he wouldn’t now.” But she says his style is not confrontational. “He’s a good old boy. He wears cowboy boots. … He’s a personable guy.” She adds that “he’s got solid conservative credentials,” noting that his web page is emblazoned with “God Bless America!!!”“He is an excellent choice,” says Tobin Smith, vice president for policy at the Association of American Universities in Washington, D.C. “He has a strong understanding of issues of concern to research universities.”“Kelvin is a solid scientist, excellent with people, and with deep experience with large bureaucracies,” says Cliff Mass, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “A moderate voice that won’t politicize the science.”Droegemeier, who has served on the faculty of The University of Oklahoma (OU) in Norman for 33 years and been the school’s vice president for research since 2009, has long been rumored to be in the running for the OSTP job, which entails advising the president on technical issues and overseeing coordination of federal science policy. He is no stranger to Washington, D.C.; then-President George W. Bush named him to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, in 2004, and Obama reappointed him in 2011. He served as the board’s vice-chair from 2014 to 2017.He has also served as a formal and informal adviser to federal and state politicians. He leads a state science advisory panel named by Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, and advised former Oklahoma Representative Jim Bridenstine (R), now the administrator of NASA. Recently, he helped craft federal legislation aimed at bolstering weather forecasting that Congress passed last year with bipartisan support. Those connections—as well as his links to David Boren, a former Democratic senator from Oklahoma who last month retired from the OU presidency—likely helped bring Droegemeier’s name to the attention of the Trump administration.A serious scientistDroegemeier, who is 59, earned his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois in Urbana in 1985. As a researcher, he focused on numerical weather forecasting, including studies of thunderstorm dynamics, and helped develop the use of supercomputers to run atmospheric models. He helped found and lead two NSF-funded centers: One focused on the analysis and prediction of storms, the other was a hub for “collaborative adaptive sensing of the atmosphere.” His most cited paper—with 1066 citations—described a “multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction model” and was published in 2000 in the journal Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics.“His command of both science and policy issues is nearly unmatched in the community,” says Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and president of the American Meteorological Society in Boston. Wakimoto says he has known Droegemeier since graduate school and predicts he will be “a superb spokesperson for the community.”“Kelvin is one of the most respected colleagues in the field of meteorology but also has the experience and savvy to interact at the highest policy levels,” adds Marshall Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Georgia in Athens and chair of NASA’s Earth Sciences Advisory Committee.Challenges aheadIf confirmed by the Senate, Droegemeier will take the helm of an office that has been buffeted by change and uncertainty. Under Obama, OSTP’s staff grew to some 135 people, and it was active in shaping budget and policy plans, particularly in the climate change arena. Under Trump, OSTP’s staff plummeted to about 35 last year but has since grown to about 60 under the leadership of its de facto head, OSTP Deputy Chief Technology Officer Michael Kratsios.Holdren says Droegemeier has “a big challenge ahead of him. … I look forward to seeing what he’s able to accomplish in a very challenging circumstance.” Trump has a reputation for ignoring expert advice. But “it could well be that [Droegemeier is] thinking: ‘Here’s a chance to make a small difference and to at least be a small voice of reason,’” says Rick Anthes, president emeritus of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.One of Droegemeier’s first tasks, Holdren says, will be to develop strong working relationships with other senior White House staff, including the head of the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the annual budget request to Congress. Thus far, Holdren believes Trump’s budget requests, which have called for large cuts in some science agencies, “reflect that weakness of not having a senior scientist engaged as an equal in that process.” Another task, Holdren believes, will be “rebuilding the science part” of OSTP, which under Trump has emphasized technology and workforce issues.“Having such a strong leader. … as head of OSTP is essential to ensuring science is a key factor considered in the policymaking process,” says Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities in Washington, D.C. “All Americans are better off when science has a seat at the table.”Mostly, researchers are relieved that science will finally have some voice in the White House. “I wish it had happened a lot earlier,” Holdren says. “But on the other hand, many of us weren’t sure it would ever happen.”With reporting by Adrian Cho, Eric Hand, Jocelyn Kaiser, and Paul Voosen.last_img read more

Sachin Tendulkar was disappointed with Kapil Dev as coach

first_img(From left) Kapil Dev, Mohammed Azharuddin and Sachin Tendulkar celebrate after beating West Indies in the Cricket Association of Bengal’s Diamond Jubilee six nation tournament in Calcutta on November 27, 1993. Photo: ReutersOne of the finest Indian allrounders of all time, Kapil Dev was a “disappointment” when it came to coaching, reveals batting maestro Sachin Tendulkar in his just-released autobiography Playing It My Way, a PTI report stated.Tendulkar has claimed that he was left disappointed by Kapil during one of the Australia tours since the coach never involved himself in strategic discussions.In the chapter Tumultuous Times: India in Australia, November 1999-January 2000 Tendulkar has written that he had high expectations from Kapil.”During my second stint as captain, we had Kapil Dev as our coach. He is one of the finest cricketers to have played for India and one of the best allrounders of all time, and I had great expectations of him in Australia.”I have always maintained that the coach’s job is an important one, for he is in a position to play a key role in formulating team strategy. Who better than Kapil to come up with options for me during a tough tour of Australia?”However, his method of involvement and his thought process was limited to leaving the running of the team to the captain, and hence he did not involve himself in strategic discussions that would help us on the field,” Tendulkar writes.The Indian batting great also shared his frustration on how some of his moves as captain did not pay off but the same strategy clicked when other captains employed it.advertisementTendulkar talked about the 1997 Sharjah series where he promoted Robin Singh to bat at number three but the southpaw failed and he had to cop heavy criticism from the media.”The match against Pakistan on December 14 highlights how things were just not going my way. I was batting at number four in this competition, at the selectors’ request. Sourav and Navjot Sidhu had given us a good start against Pakistan, and when Sidhu got out at 143 for 2, I sent in Robin Singh, the all-rounder, to accelerate the innings. It was a strategy I had given considerable thought to. .”Manzoor Akhtar, the leg-spinner, was at one end bowling around the wicket to the right-handed batsmen. The theory was that Robin, a left-hander, would be able to negotiate his leg-spin better and also hit some big shots. However, Robin got out without scoring after just three balls from Azhar Mahmood, the medium-pacer, and the experiment proved a disaster. In the press I was criticised for sending in Robin ahead of me and the move was blamed for our defeat,” Tendulkar recalled.”A month later, however, in January 1998, Azhar, back as captain, repeated the very same move in the final of the Silver Jubilee Independence Cup in Dhaka against Pakistan.”Robin was sent in at three to keep up the momentum after Sourav and I had got off to a flier and this time Robin played a terrific hand, scoring 82 and setting up the run chase.”This was arguably a bigger gamble, because he was pitted against the off-spinner Saqlain Mushtaq and it is no secret that left-handers find it more difficult against off-spinners.”The same experiment was now hailed as a master stroke.Not without reason is it said that success has many fathers while defeat is an orphan,” he wrote.last_img read more

Ravi Shastri has a message for those who missed out on World Cup spot

first_imgAlso Read:Andre Russell faces yet another injury scare AdvertisementIndian coach Ravi Shastri feels that the players who missed their opportunity to make it to the world cup squad shouldn’t feel disappointed.The chief selectors announced on Monday the squad for the Indian team that will travel to England next month for the ICC Cricket World Cup. This side has seen exclusion of some players that has brought about a debate amongst the fans.The squad that was announced saw Ambati Rayudu miss out on a spot despite playing regularly for the national team for over a year. Similarly, experience was opted over form as Rishabh Pant saw his place being lost to Dinesh Karthik.With Rayudu’s tweet yesterday clearly showing that he wasn’t very happy with his exclusion, Ravi Shastri spoke to the media stating that the players shouldn’t lose heart on missing out on a spot.He went on to state that the players who missed out could be roped in anytime due to injuries that may occur in the course of the tournament. Also Shastri felt disappointed that the side could consist of only 15 members and not more taking into account that the side had to play 9 group stage games.“Keep at it. India is a big country and from 1.2 billion people only 15 players can be selected. I would have preferred 16, but even then, someone or the other would have missed out. When you have a pool of 18 or 19 players, who can make the team, there is bound to be some people who will miss out and it is unfortunate but they should not lose heart,” said Shastri.“Cricket is a funny game, there could be injuries to players so you never know when you could be called up,” he said. Advertisementlast_img read more

Italian GP: Lewis Hamilton becomes first back-to-back winner in 2017, takes championship lead

first_imgMercedes’ Lewis Hamilton won the Italian Grand Prix on Sunday with a dominant drive and went clear at the top of the Formula One world championship for the first time in the year.The triple champion, who started the race from a record 69th career pole position, led Finnish team mate Valtteri Bottas to a runaway one-two finish in front of the massed ranks of red-shirted Ferrari fans.BREAKING: @LewisHamilton wins at Monza to take the lead in the drivers’ championship #ItalianGP ???? #F1 pic.twitter.com/Sk2ikB1dlh- Formula 1 (@F1) September 3, 2017?? Silver liningA day to remember for @MercedesAMGF1 at Monza #ItalianGP ???? #F1 pic.twitter.com/V19zYnTO2L- Formula 1 (@F1) September 3, 2017Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel, who had led the standings since he won the Australian season-opener in March, finished third and 36.3 seconds behind the winner.Hamilton is now three points clear of the German, with seven races remaining.UPDATED DRIVER STANDINGS ???@LewisHamilton is now leading the championship for the first time this season! #ItalianGP ???? #F1 pic.twitter.com/KantdrUHhx- Formula 1 (@F1) September 3, 2017Hamilton had won the Belgian Grand Prix on August 27 to mark his 200th Formula One race and had reduced Vettel’s championship lead to just seven points.With the win in Italy, Hamilton has won back-to-back races, becoming the first to do so this year.(With inputs from Reuters)last_img read more