Your Event Doesn’t Exist Without Speakers and Volunteers

first_imgA tweet from my friend David Bisset captured my attention this morning:My policy on official speakers needing to buy tickets for the WordCamp / event they’re speaking at: It should never happen. Period.— David Bisset (@dimensionmedia) January 26, 2015 Well, of course. That’s how I plan all the not-for-profit events I’m involved with. Whether it’s a WordCamp, Refresh Detroit meetup, Detroit User Experience event, Metro Detroit WordPress meeting, or HighEdWeb Michigan conference, anyone who speaks at the event is admitted for free. I’ve written about that in the past. Same thing for volunteers. Anyone who offers to help out at an event, as an event planner, room host, photographer, or social media manager, attends the event for free. Speakers and volunteers are generously donating their time and skills to make your event a success. Your event doesn’t exist without speakers and volunteers.Tim’s Blog PostThat’s when I discovered the blog post that prompted David’s tweet: Respect your conference speakers and volunteers by Tim Nash, published earlier today. Very sad, but why I won’t be talking at WordCamp Birmingham UK in a few weeks – https://t.co/JJPRIQL2r7— Tim Nash (@tnash) January 26, 2015In his post, Nash explains how he submitted a talk for a local WordCamp, only to later discover he had to pay to speak at the event. He decided not to speak at the event. Read the post. It’s a well-written post about event organizing, speakers, and volunteers. I completely agree with his thoughts on speakers and volunteers attending not-for-profit events for free. It’s a gesture of respect.And I personally liked Nash’s comment about changing our mindset about donating to an event. Whether you’re an event organizer, speaker, or volunteer, you’re donating many hours and days of your time to the event. The least you can do is give them a ticket.He also shares tips on what you can do as a potential attendee, sponsor, volunteer, or speaker to change the thinking of event planners on charging speakers and volunteers.Another Event Planner’s PerspectiveAfter replying to several of David’s tweets, my friend Angela Bergmann and I chatted about event planning, speakers, and volunteers. @redcrew Exactly! And for WCNC, we assume a +1. My husband is always with me, especially since I drive everywhere usually.— Angie Bergmann 🖤🦄 (@radkitten) January 26, 2015Bergmann graciously accepted my invitation to share her thoughts for this post:Speakers are what drives your conference. I would never expect to be monetarily compensated for speaking at a non-profit conference like WordCamp, but I do expect at a minimum for my ticket to be comped. I’d also appreciate if my +1 is comped, as I do not like to travel alone.I learned something new. For past events, I had not considered providing a free ticket for a +1. Something I’m adding to my event planning task list.She added, “While a speaker gets to attend a conference, they are not free to attend any session they wish. And I frequently find myself spending the majority of a conference fielding questions and preparing for my topic anyway.” “It isn’t as though I am getting the same value from the conference as a regular attendee. This doesn’t even account for the time spent preparing for the event and the cost of travel, ” Bergmann told me.She said, “As an organizer for WordCamp North Canton, we assume the speaker and a +1 will be attending.” We:Comp their tickets for the speaker and their +1Provide a nice speaker dinner (with the +1)Give a speaker giftBergmann ended our conversation, Just like we are donating our time for this event, they are as well. Without our speakers there is no conference to attend.I’d like to hear your thoughts. Am I missing something? As a speaker, volunteer, or event organizer, do you expect to attend the event for free? Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedHow-to Tips for Organizing WordCampsEarlier this year, Andrea Middleton of WordCamp Central kicked off the first of several online chats for WordCamp organizers. The online chats are intended to provide help, support, and tips for WordCamp organizers as they plan their events. I was able to attend the first chat on organizing WordCamps and…In “Conference”Can You Livestream the Event?As many of you know, I’m an event planner and leader for several local meetup groups. I organize events for Refresh Detroit, West Metro Detroit WordPress, and Metro Detroit WordPress meetup groups. Since the mid 2000’s, I estimate I’ve organized 350+ monthly meetup events, workshops, in-person conferences, and group viewing…In “Technology”What is a WordCamp?Last Sunday at our Metro Detroit WordPress meetup, we saw a lot of new members attend the WordPress REST API presentation, which was great. I think the attraction of a developer-focused talk brought in a lot of new people. Before the presentation started, one of our long-time members asked who…In “Conference”last_img read more

Movie legend John Travolta visits 707’s new Aussie home

first_imgThe quid pro quo was that Qantas took over the aircraft’s expensive maintenance.The actor put the plane up for sale several years ago and decided to donate it after an approach from HARS.Bringing the aircraft back to Australia is a costly exercise and anyone keen to support the project can make a tax-deductible donation. The email is HARSInfo@hars.org.au. John Travolta with his 707 in Sydney during a visit some years ago. New photos have emerged of a quick visit by movie star John Travolta to the future home of his donated Boeing 707-138 in November during an Australian speaking tour.The surprise visit to the Historical Aircraft Restoration Society at Albion Park, south of Sydney, saw the aviation enthusiast take a flight on the society’s restored Lockheed Super Constellation, affectionately known as Connie.READ: American app now scans your passport chip.Travolta has donated his ex-Qantas Boeing 707 to HARS and the aircraft is currently in Brunswick, Georgia where it is being prepared for the flight to its new home at newly renamed Shellharbour Airport early next year.The latest HARS newsletter said the movie legend met many HARS volunteers and visitors and enjoyed a tour of the museum before going for the flight on the Constellation.TravoltaHollywood legend John Travolta with “Connie”. Photos: M. Keech courtesy of HARSThe 737 was originally scheduled to arrive in November but was relocated to a hangar in Brunswick while work was done to comply with an Airworthiness Directive relating to the attachment fittings for the aircraft’s four engines.The plane, which started life as VH-EBM,  is the last of 13 707s specially built for Qantas and known as “hotrods”.The Boeing 138B was about 10ft shorter than the standard 707 to give it better airfield performance and range.TravoltaTravolta’s aircraft was delivered to Qantas in 1964 and sold to Braniff International Airways in 1969.It was converted to a VIP jet in 1973 and had a number of owners, including singer Frank Sinatra and billionaire Kirk Kirkorian.Travolta first came into contact with it while filming “Get Shorty” but had to wait three years before it hit the right price in 1998.travoltaTravolta bore the cost of maintaining the aircraft for the first four years, before striking a deal with then Qantas chief executive Geoff Dixon to paint the plane in Qantas colors and come on board as the airline’s ambassador.last_img read more

Columbia and IBM Launch Green Tech Skills Initiative

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#start#startups Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img audrey watters Figures released in February suggested that VC investment in cleantech startups, particularly those focused on energy efficiency, was on the rise.To help prepare college students for jobs in this emerging green economy, Columbia University and IBM are announcing the launch of the Smarter Cities Skills Initiative.The Smarter Cities Initiatives opens IBM’s global resources to Columbia faculty and students, including access to the 40 IBM Innovation Centers worldwide. The intiative builds upon Columbia’s existing research efforts on sustainability issues, spanning several academic disciplines including business, law and engineering. The initiative will provide students with free access to:IBM software, both on campus and in the cloud, to develop software for sustainability and green projectsTechnical support for green technology courses that show students how to build energy efficient IT infrastructure for smart buildings, smart grids and smart water systemsEnergy efficiency and open standards software development tools on IBM developerWorks100,000 global business partners and academic communities through 40 IBM Innovation Centers in 30 countries “Smart urban infrastructures are key to long term environmental and economic sustainability,” said Rich Lechner, vice president, IBM Energy and Environment. “IBM and Columbia share a common goal to ensure the next generation of entrepreneurs have access to the skills they need to accelerate sustainability projects and to be competitive when they enter the workforce.” Lechner says the necessary skills for being successful in the emerging green economy include technical skills, particularly in the areas of data analytics, visualizations and security, understanding of business processes, and the historical and policy-based knowledge that can help transform industries like the energy sector.In recognition of Earth Day, the initiative will be announced on Thursday at Columbia University to faculty, students, venture capitalists, policy analysts, and industry leaders at the first annual Smarter Students for a Smarter Planet forum. More than 150 schools around the world are expected to participate via webcast. The forum will explore the skills necessary to prepare students for green jobs, and help academia and industry jumpstart a global collaboration toward developing sustainable technologies and a green economy. Related Posts last_img read more

Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews

first_img Trump’s pick to head White House science office gets good reviews Sue Ogrocki/Associated Press By David MalakoffJul. 31, 2018 , 6:20 PM The long wait for a White House science adviser is over. President Donald Trump announced today that he intends to nominate meteorologist Kelvin Droegemeier, a university administrator and former vice-chair of the governing board of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF), to be director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). The OSTP director traditionally, but not always, also holds the title of the president’s science adviser.The move caps a search process of record-setting length—nearly 560 days, double the longest time taken by any other modern president to name an OSTP director. Many in the research community had lamented the delay. But the wait may have been worth it: Droegemeier, a respected veteran of the Washington, D.C., policymaking scene, is getting positive reviews from science and university groups.“He’s a very good pick. … He has experience speaking science to power,” says environmental policy expert John Holdren, who served as science adviser under former President Barack Obama and is now at Harvard University. “I expect he’ll be energetic in defending the R&D budget and climate change research in particular.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)center_img Kelvin Droegemeier Maria Zuber, a planetary geophysicist and vice president for research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, agrees that Droegemeier will stand up for climate science. “He always has. I see no reason why he wouldn’t now.” But she says his style is not confrontational. “He’s a good old boy. He wears cowboy boots. … He’s a personable guy.” She adds that “he’s got solid conservative credentials,” noting that his web page is emblazoned with “God Bless America!!!”“He is an excellent choice,” says Tobin Smith, vice president for policy at the Association of American Universities in Washington, D.C. “He has a strong understanding of issues of concern to research universities.”“Kelvin is a solid scientist, excellent with people, and with deep experience with large bureaucracies,” says Cliff Mass, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Washington in Seattle. “A moderate voice that won’t politicize the science.”Droegemeier, who has served on the faculty of The University of Oklahoma (OU) in Norman for 33 years and been the school’s vice president for research since 2009, has long been rumored to be in the running for the OSTP job, which entails advising the president on technical issues and overseeing coordination of federal science policy. He is no stranger to Washington, D.C.; then-President George W. Bush named him to the National Science Board, which oversees NSF, in 2004, and Obama reappointed him in 2011. He served as the board’s vice-chair from 2014 to 2017.He has also served as a formal and informal adviser to federal and state politicians. He leads a state science advisory panel named by Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin, and advised former Oklahoma Representative Jim Bridenstine (R), now the administrator of NASA. Recently, he helped craft federal legislation aimed at bolstering weather forecasting that Congress passed last year with bipartisan support. Those connections—as well as his links to David Boren, a former Democratic senator from Oklahoma who last month retired from the OU presidency—likely helped bring Droegemeier’s name to the attention of the Trump administration.A serious scientistDroegemeier, who is 59, earned his Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois in Urbana in 1985. As a researcher, he focused on numerical weather forecasting, including studies of thunderstorm dynamics, and helped develop the use of supercomputers to run atmospheric models. He helped found and lead two NSF-funded centers: One focused on the analysis and prediction of storms, the other was a hub for “collaborative adaptive sensing of the atmosphere.” His most cited paper—with 1066 citations—described a “multi-scale nonhydrostatic atmospheric simulation and prediction model” and was published in 2000 in the journal Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics.“His command of both science and policy issues is nearly unmatched in the community,” says Roger Wakimoto, vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Los Angeles, and president of the American Meteorological Society in Boston. Wakimoto says he has known Droegemeier since graduate school and predicts he will be “a superb spokesperson for the community.”“Kelvin is one of the most respected colleagues in the field of meteorology but also has the experience and savvy to interact at the highest policy levels,” adds Marshall Shepherd, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Georgia in Athens and chair of NASA’s Earth Sciences Advisory Committee.Challenges aheadIf confirmed by the Senate, Droegemeier will take the helm of an office that has been buffeted by change and uncertainty. Under Obama, OSTP’s staff grew to some 135 people, and it was active in shaping budget and policy plans, particularly in the climate change arena. Under Trump, OSTP’s staff plummeted to about 35 last year but has since grown to about 60 under the leadership of its de facto head, OSTP Deputy Chief Technology Officer Michael Kratsios.Holdren says Droegemeier has “a big challenge ahead of him. … I look forward to seeing what he’s able to accomplish in a very challenging circumstance.” Trump has a reputation for ignoring expert advice. But “it could well be that [Droegemeier is] thinking: ‘Here’s a chance to make a small difference and to at least be a small voice of reason,’” says Rick Anthes, president emeritus of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.One of Droegemeier’s first tasks, Holdren says, will be to develop strong working relationships with other senior White House staff, including the head of the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the annual budget request to Congress. Thus far, Holdren believes Trump’s budget requests, which have called for large cuts in some science agencies, “reflect that weakness of not having a senior scientist engaged as an equal in that process.” Another task, Holdren believes, will be “rebuilding the science part” of OSTP, which under Trump has emphasized technology and workforce issues.“Having such a strong leader. … as head of OSTP is essential to ensuring science is a key factor considered in the policymaking process,” says Peter McPherson, president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities in Washington, D.C. “All Americans are better off when science has a seat at the table.”Mostly, researchers are relieved that science will finally have some voice in the White House. “I wish it had happened a lot earlier,” Holdren says. “But on the other hand, many of us weren’t sure it would ever happen.”With reporting by Adrian Cho, Eric Hand, Jocelyn Kaiser, and Paul Voosen.last_img read more

Premier Badminton League: Carolina Marin defeats PV Sindhu, Hyderabad pip Chennai 4-3 in opener

first_imgRio Olympics champion Carolina Marin kicked-off the second edition of Premier Badminton League in style, winning a closely contested encounter against PV Sindhu and guiding Hyderabad Hunters to 4-3 win over Chennai Smashers.The marquee match saw the Spaniard having the last laugh, winning 11-8, 12-14, 11-2.Chennai came back into the contest with Tomy Sugiarto winning the first men’s singles, beating B Sai Praneeth to make it 1-1.The top British husband-wife pair of Chris and Gabby Adcock won the mixed doubles rubber which Chennai had marked as their ‘Trump match’. The win gave them two points and made it 3-1.In a must-win second men’s singles match of the day, Rajiv Ouseph of Hyderabad scored a thrilling 11-6, 11-8, 11-6 win against Tanongsak Saensomboonsuk to make it 2-3.Hyderabad had no option but to choose the final men’s doubles rubber as their ‘Trump match’ where Boon Heong Tan-Wee Kiong Tan beat Mads Pieter Kolding-B Sumeeth Reddy 11-7 and 11-8 to make it 4-3.Earlier, in the Marin versus Sindhu encounter, the first game saw the Spaniard opening the scoring, only for Sindhu to equalise soon after. It was a see-saw battle with both the players scoring on regulation. With scores tied at 4-4, it was the Spaniard who opened up a three-point gap to go up 9-6.Sindhu pulled one back, but Marin quickly stole one more point to go up 10-8.With game point in her favour, Marin did not try to do anything enterprising and was eventually rewarded for her patience as the Chennai player hit the nets to let her rival walk away with the opening game.advertisementIn the second game, it was Marin who started from where she left and took the attack straight to her opponent. She notched up points at will to go 5-2 up and it looked like she will not have to lose much sweat in the second game.However, Sindhu had other plans and fought her way back to take five consecutive points to lead the game 7-5. The Spaniard however was in no mood to let go her opponent so easily and she took four back-to-back points to go up 9-7.Sindhu stole one and so did Marin and with the score reading 10-8 in Marin’s favour, it looked like match was all but over. However, Sindhu fought back brilliantly to not only save three match points but to win 14-12 and level the match.With the high intensity action in the second game, it looked like the deciding game would be even more action packed. But Marin did not even let Sindhu settle and stormed her way to take the game 11-2 and win the match and also break Sindhu’s unbeatable run in the league.Delighted with her win, Marin said: “It was a wonderful match and the way the crowd was behind, it was wonderful. Their support meant and lot and helped me to perform a lot better.”(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

More pressure on Liverpool than Man City, says Redknapp

first_imgJamie Redknapp believes Liverpool are coping well with the pressure of the Premier League title race but the former captain knows from experience how difficult the run-in will be for Jurgen Klopp’s men.The Reds are chasing a first top-flight championship since 1989-90 and, with 12 matches of the season left, sit level on points with leaders Manchester City with a game in hand.However, Liverpool have passed up opportunities to pull clear of City in recent weeks, failing to capitalise on the champions’ defeat at Newcastle United as they drew at home to Leicester City, before Jurgen Klopp’s men were also held at West Ham. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! Consecutive draws were followed by a win at home to Bournemouth, though, and Redknapp expects further twists and turns.”I think they’re coping well. Their record has been good as well,” Redknapp told Omnisport . “I’ll be amazed if Liverpool don’t lose the odd game here or there in the title run-in and it’s the same with Man City. It’s impossible. These teams have got so many games ahead of them and the pressure’s on all the teams.”I think it’s just important how you react after [losing]. Even if Liverpool lose this game on Sunday [against Manchester United], it doesn’t mean they’re not going to win the title still, it’s how you react after and make sure you pick up three points and you don’t get affected by the pressure you get put under.”Of course there’s more pressure on Liverpool than there is on City. I don’t care what anyone says.”I’ve been there, a captain trying to win the title for Liverpool, and it weighs heavily on your shoulders because of all the history and all the greats that have won the league title.”It’s 29 years since they last won it and it’s very hard to take. I’m not trying to add to the pressure but that’s what it is. You’re going to have to get used to it and, if they win it once, they’ll probably do what happened with United, they’ll go and win it again.”Redknapp does not believe it is a straight shoot-out between Liverpool and City, though, with Tottenham just five points behind the two frontrunners.”You have to put [Spurs] in it,” he said. “If they win that game on Saturday, they’re then putting pressure on a City side that have a cup game. The games are coming thick and fast for the other teams.”Tottenham haven’t got the FA Cup. I know they’ve got the Champions League – 3-0 up already [against Borussia Dortmund], they should be fine in that situation – and they’ve got Harry Kane coming back, Dele Alli’s not going to be far away, so you have to put them in the equation.”There is a situation that could arise where Liverpool and Man City fight it out and put themselves under pressure and Tottenham make a late run. It’s happened before.”But they’re obviously third favourites, the bookies will tell you that. I do think the title will be won by either City or Liverpool but if Tottenham did it wouldn’t surprise me.”Redknapp was speaking on behalf of TAG Heuer, Official Timekeeping Partner of the Premier League to promote the TAG Heuer Premier League Pressure Test. Subscribe to Goal’s Liverpool Correspondent Neil Jones’ weekly email bringing you the best Liverpool FC writing from around the weblast_img read more