Buffy SainteMarie wins 2015 Polaris Music Prize

first_imgThe Canadian Press TORONTO — Buffy Sainte-Marie has won this year’s 50-thousand dollar Polaris Music Prize.A jury of 11 music critics, bloggers and broadcasters named the album “Power in the Blood” the best Canadian record of the last year.The folk icon beat out nine other finalists for the award including rap superstar Drake, former Polaris winner Caribou and Toronto rockers Alvvays.Sainte-Marie, who already had a crowded trophy case heading into Monday night’saward ceremony, told the audience she didn’t expect to win the Polaris and appreciated its cash prize.The award show, which was held in Toronto, was hosted by Juno-winning children’s entertainer Fred Penner.last_img

India was granted permission to wear caps in memory of fallen soldiers

first_imgNew Delhi: The International Cricket Council (ICC) Monday said India was granted permission to wear camouflage military caps in the third ODI against Australia as a tribute to the country’s armed forces, a gesture which Pakistan has objected to. In the third ODI in Ranchi on March 8, the Indian team sported military caps as a mark of respect to the CRPF personnel who were killed in the Pulwama terror attack and donated its match fee to the National Defence Fund. Also Read – Dhoni, Paes spotted playing football together”The BCCI sought permission from the ICC to wear the caps as part of a fundraising drive and in memory of fallen soldiers who have died, which was granted,” ICC’s General Manager Strategic Communications Claire Furlong said. The Pakistan Cricket Board had sent a strongly-worded letter to the ICC, calling for action against India for wearing the caps. “They took permission from ICC for some other purpose and used it to do something else, which is not acceptable,” PCB Chairman Ehsan Mani said on Sunday. Last month, the BCCI had asked the ICC to “sever ties with countries from which terrorism emanates” following the Pulwama attack in which 40 CRPF jawans were killed. The responsibility of the attack was taken by Pakistan-based terror outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed.last_img read more

Do celebs make good politicians

first_imgStar power adds the glamour element to the heat, dust, and grime of political campaigns. This election too, we won’t just see star campaigners but even celebs who have picked up the political cudgels. Soothing to the eyes, yes, but one often wonders if celebrityhood can and should be the only criterion for some of the candidates in the election fray? Celebrity entrants to political parties just ahead of elections is not new. Earlier, we witnessed well-known actors and sportspersons simply lending their star power to a candidate. Today, that candidate can very well be a young actor or a cricketer. But it is a varied mix. Outspoken social media supporters such as cricketer Gautam Gambhir joined BJP and is likely to fight from a Delhi seat. At the same time, you have actors such as Shatrughan Sinha and Hema Malini seeking re-election while Jaya Prada has switched party colours to don BJP’s saffron to fight polls from Uttar Pradesh’s Rampur. West Bengal will see Babul Supriyo, Moon Moon Sen, and newbies Nusrat Jahan and Mimi Chakraborty battling for votes. There are also Prakash Raj, Urmila Matondkar, Nikhil Gowda, Pawan Kalyan, Shilpa Shinde, and Arshi Khan, trying their luck in the political arena. Also Read – A special kind of bondOut of this mixed list of celebrities, only a chosen few have exhibited an active interest in politics. They have been vociferous about their views and where they stand on the political spectrum. The rest, like dutiful children, are all being paradropped to exude charm and attract votes. I was watching a rather painful news story with dream girl Hema Malini. Painful because the BJP MP while looking stunning didn’t seem to have any meat in her rhetoric at all. Whenever she was asked about what work she had done in her constituency of Mathura, the actor kept saying that she has done a lot of work but just can’t remember it at the moment. Err! Really? Also Read – Insider threat managementAs a reporter who has actively covered state and general elections, I have witnessed how candidates have nurtured their constituency over years. While covering the campaign trail it is fairly easy for people like us to discern the once-in-a-blue-moon visitor from the serious politician who has an undeniable connect with people. This bond with the voter doesn’t happen overnight. Sure, people will throng the streets to catch a glimpse of cine stars, but a true leader would have built his connect over a longer period of time with experience and love for the masses. Of the celebrity MPs who have already been in Parliament, save a few, most have been playing ‘outstanding’ roles i.e. they have seldom stepped inside the Parliament! Their attendance is poor, they barely raise questions, and more often than not, leave their MPLADS (Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme) funds under-utilised. Former Rajya Sabha MPs such as Sachin Tendulkar and Rekha have historically abysmal attendance records – Tendulkar with 7.3 per cent attendance while Rekha had just 4.5 per cent! It is important to remember that these celebrity MPs get paid a generous sum by the Government of India to carry out their duties. They are meant to represent their people in Parliament and actively strive towards the development and progress of their constituency. But with most celeb MPs playing truant from Parliament and their constituencies, busy with film shoots, shows, brand endorsements, and cricket matches, one wonders if fame is enough to even allow these fair-weather entrants to contest. Should there be a clause set by the Election Commission of India to allow only serious political workers to fight polls? And what of the hardworking party worker who has lost his chance to fight elections outdone by glitz and glamour? Politics is no child’s play; it requires sincerity, hard work, and dedication. My only wish is that this year’s winning celebrity candidates showcase their seriousness about serving the people. Otherwise, there will be more ‘missing MP’ posters doing the rounds like in the case of Navjot Singh Sindhu in 2013. (The writer is a journalist and media entrepreneur. The views expressed are strictly personal)last_img read more

Lanka President Sirisena promises hoteliers maximum financial help to revive tourism

first_imgColombo: Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena has assured hoteliers that the government will give them maximum financial relief to revive the lucrative tourism industry hit by the country’s worst terror attack on Easter Sunday that killed 253 people, including 42 foreigners. Tourism accounts for about five per cent of Sri Lanka’s economy, with India, Britain and China being the main markets. India is the largest source market for Sri Lanka, which received 2.3 million tourists from around the world in 2018. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportAround 450,000 Indian tourists visited Sri Lanka last year and the island nation was expecting the total Indian tourist arrivals to cross one million in 2019. President Sirisena acknowledged during his meeting on Monday with the country’s hoteliers that the tourism and hotel industries were worst hit after the string of powerful blasts ripped through three churches and as many luxury hotels on Easter Sunday, killing 253 people and injuring more than 500 others. Also Read – Iraq military admits ‘excessive force’ used in deadly protestsThe bombs tore through three five-star hotels in Colombo: the Cinnamon Grand, the Shangri La and the Kingsbury. Forty two foreigners, including 11 Indian nationals, died in the attacks. Sirisena requested Central Bank Governor Indrajit Coomaraswamy to provide “maximum financial relief” immediately to the hoteliers, Sunday Times reported. Hotels Association President Sanath Ukwatte said hoteliers had invested large sums of money in the development of the hotels and requested the government to provide a moratorium or waiver on the capital and interest for a period of at least two years. During the meeting, the hoteliers also asked the government to hire the services of a professional public relations and communications unit to send out one message to the world. President Sirisena agreed to appoint a Cabinet sub-committee to look into the requirements of the hoteliers, the report said.last_img read more

EC to retain 200 companies of Central Forces till May 27

first_imgKolkata: The Election Commission will retain 200 companies of Central Forces in the state till May 27, to assist counting and also to handle post-poll violence, if any. Out of the 200 companies, 82 will be deployed for the counting centres while the rest will be deployed in areas where the commission anticipates post-poll violence.”The remaining 510 companies of Central Forces that were present in the state during the last phase of elections on Sunday, will move out now,” a senior EC official said. According to the EC official, there will be 58 counting centres across the state, with at least one centre in each of the 42 parliamentary constituencies. There will be 144 observers deputed for the counting process. “There will be a three-tier security system and section 144 will be imposed around all counting centres. The first layer will be maintained by the state police to keep interested people out of the purview of the counting centres. The second layer will be managed by the state armed police, while the third layer – in and around the counting halls – will be maintained by the Central Forces,” the official said. Apart from the returning officers and the observers, none will be allowed with mobile phones and cameras within the counting halls. All the halls will be under CCTV surveillance and will be covered by webcasting so that it can be directly controlled by the Commission. The candidates will have to give detailed lists of the counting agents beforehand. All the people allowed to enter the counting halls will be closely frisked. The vehicles carrying the EVMs will be GPS-enabled, so that their movement can be tracked. According to sources in the CEO’s office in Bengal, the entire process of counting might take 14 hours or more. Only one table will be counted at a time. Once it is finished, counting will start for the next table. 5 percent of VVPATs will be counted from each Assembly constituency. VVPATs will be counted after the completion of counting the ballot units.last_img read more

Laughter is not Medicine Study

first_imgEl Jaddida – A new scholarly review conducted by the British Medical Journal (BMJ) affirms the various risks of laughter on people.“Laughter is Medicine” has been around for a long time until researches carried by the BMJ unveiled the hidden drawbacks of laughter.According to the same study, laughter may cause jaws to dislocate, hernia to pop out, asthma attacks, headaches, cardiac arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat or abnormal heart rhythm), ribs to break if laughter is fierce and urinary tract problems when laughter is suppressed. However, despite the erstwhile drawbacks, doctors do not deny the advantages of laughter.For instance, it can reduce anger, anxiety and stress.It can also reduce cardiovascular tension, blood glucose concentration and risk of myocardial infarction.In short, before you decide to put a frown on your face, a nice smile is the best gift to give people around you. Smile and the world will smile back to you.last_img read more

In Cooperstown a Crowded Waiting Room

Jessie Schwartz for The New York Times Baseball writers elected no one to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday, despite what might have been the deepest ballot in years.The failure of the writers to pick Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens was not a surprise given the low vote totals received in the past by Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro, other players associated with the use performance-enhancing drugs. But the vote totals for Bonds and Clemens, just 36 and 38 percent, were lower than expected.Craig Biggio, who received 68.2 percent of the vote in his first year of eligibility, will almost certainly make it into the Hall of Fame someday. Still, his profile is quite similar to Robin Yount and Roberto Alomar, two players who did better in their first year on the ballot. (Yount got 77.5 percent of the vote in his first year on the ballot in 1999, while Alomar got 73.7 percent of the vote in 2010 and made it in the next year.)Perhaps the clearest effect of the crowded ballot, however, was realized among candidates who were returning to the ballot from last year. Of the 13 players who carried over from the 2012 ballot, nine received a lower share of the vote, including Lee Smith, Alan Trammell, Fred McGriff, Don Mattingly and Bernie Williams.This is atypical; instead, players usually add votes with each additional year they spend on the ballot. Since 1967, when the Hall of Fame adopted balloting rules similar to the ones it uses now, about two-thirds of holdover players gained ground from their prior year’s vote percentage.It is possible to be a bit more precise about this pattern. Based on an analysis of Hall of Fame voting between 1967 and 2011, I found that the increase in a player’s vote total is typically proportional to his percentage from the previous year. In his second year on the ballot, for example, the typical player’s vote share increases by a multiple of about 1.1.Thus, a player who received 10 percent of the vote in his first year would be expected to receive about 11 percent on his second try, while a player who got 50 percent of the vote would go up to 55 percent.The pace of improvement is typically highest in the first several years that a player spends on the ballot, slowing down once he has been eligible five or six times. (The exception is in a player’s 15 and final year of eligibility, when he may receive a fairly large boost.) But these small percentage gains can add up, something like the way in which interest compounds over time. For example, as shown in the chart below, a player who gets just 30 percent of the vote in his first year on the ballot would be projected to make it in on his 14th year of eligibility if he follows the formula each year.In practice, the growth in a player’s vote share is rarely this smooth — and you should not necessarily expect the pattern to hold for Bonds and Clemens. (Instructively, the vote shares for McGwire and Palmeiro have actually been declining.) Nonetheless, Hall of Fame candidates typically have a tailwind as time passes.This year, however, veterans on the Hall of Fame ballot faced a headwind instead. The next chart compares the actual vote that each player received against that projected by the historical formula. Actual results in 2013 compared to projections based on historical patterns.Twelve of the 13 players underperformed their projection; the exception was Dale Murphy, who got a larger-than-average boost in his final year of eligibility, but still came nowhere close to winning election.Even some players who gained ground did not necessarily help their chances. Jack Morris went from 66.7 percent of the vote to 67.7 percent, below his projection of 69.4 percent. The small difference could be important because next year will be Morris’s final year of eligibility, and he projects to be very close to the 75 percent threshold for election. (Perhaps the player who had the best year, instead, was Tim Raines, whose vote share grew to 52.2 percent from 48.7 percent, and who is now a clear favorite to be elected someday by the writers.)Most other players lost ground outright. Trammell, in his 12th year of eligibility, declined to 33.6 percent from 36.8 percent of the vote. He was an underdog to make it in before, but now he seems to have very little chance. The same also holds for Smith, who lost most of what he gained last year after years of stagnant vote totals.McGriff, as Joe Posnanski writes, seemed to be a plausible candidate to gain ground this year as writers sought out players who were perceived as clean, as opposed to known or suspected of steroid use. Instead, his vote share declined to 20.7 percent from 23.9 percent. Williams had received just under 10 percent of the vote in his first year of eligibility, but his case was not entirely hopeless; players like Bob Lemon and Carl Hubbell were eventually selected by the writers with a similar vote total in their first year.Instead, Williams fell below the 5 percent threshold required for a player to stay on the ballot.The crowded and confusing ballot may be affecting these players in several ways. The most obvious is that the writers are limited to voting for a maximum of 10 players. This year, according to the sample of ballots collected by the Twitter user @leokitty, 24 percent of writers used all 10 of their picks. That compares with 12 percent in 2011, and just 4 percent in 2012.Did the 10-vote limit keep Biggio and Morris out of the Hall of Fame, perhaps along with other players?Actually, it was almost certainly not responsible all by itself. Of the 24 percent of writers who used all 10 ballot slots, 90 percent did name Biggio, meaning 10 percent did not. At best, therefore, if all writers who exhausted their ballots would also have named Biggio if they had unlimited votes, he would have gotten only 10 percent of the 24 percent, adding only 2.4 percentage points to his overall vote total.The logic here is that it’s hard to make a case that Biggio was only the 11th or 12th best player on the ballot. Instead, most of the writers who left him out were probably more like Jon Heyman of CBS Sports. Heyman wrote that he saw Biggio as the eighth best player on the ballot — but he also thought that only six were worthy of inclusion. Most of the writers who left Biggio out, in other words, were those who take a conservative overall approach to how many players they want in the Hall of Fame, and not those who ran out of ballot positions.Morris is a more debatable case. If all writers who maxed out their ballot slots had included him, he would have come very close to 75 percent of the vote. However, Morris is also a highly polarizing candidate. Those writers who included him often thought he was among the very best players on the ballot; on several ballots, in fact, Morris was the only player named. But other writers think he falls fall short of Hall of Fame standards and would not have picked him no matter how many votes they had to spare.Nor, obviously, were Bonds’s and Clemens’s totals affected to any material degree by the 10-player limit. Nobody left Bonds off their ballots because they thought he had only the 11th-best statistical record; they did so because they don’t think steroids users should be in the Hall of Fame. (In fact, most of the writers who maxed out their ballot slots included Bonds and Clemens; the writers who are willing to consider performance-enhancing drug users have much more crowded ballots than those who are not.)Instead, players like McGriff, Trammell, Williams and Edgar Martinez were probably most affected by the 10-player limit. The logic for McGriff, for example, is very close of the opposite of that which might be applied to Biggio. It’s fairly hard to sustain a case that McGriff was one of the best six or seven players on the ballot this year. But you might credibly argue that there is a glut of a dozen or so qualified players, McGriff among them, and you had to leave McGriff out because of the ballot limit.However, the players are not only being affected by those writers who ran out of ballot slots. There were a higher-than-average number of writers this year who listed very few players, or even none at all. Some 10 percent of voters named two or fewer players this year, according to Leokitty’s spreadsheet. That is lower than in 2012, an underwhelming year on the ballot, when 16 percent of voters did so.But it is less than 2009, 2010 or 2011, when between 3 and 8 percent of writers listed so few players. Some writers are deliberately listing very few players as a protest vote, whether against the steroids era or the Hall of Fame balloting process.Between the protest voters on the one hand, and the maxed-out voters on the other, the players are being squeezed at both ends.Finally, some players may be harmed by the psychology of the ballot. If Clemens were not on the ballot, for example, then you could credibly make a case that Curt Schilling was the best pitcher on the ballot (if you don’t think that Morris is). But Schilling’s accomplishments look poor by comparison to Clemens’s, as do those of almost any pitcher — even if you aren’t willing to vote for Clemens because of his steroids use. The same holds for outfielders whose statistics might be compared with Barry Bonds’s.There is even something to be said for the so-called “paradox of choice”: that when presented with too many options, we may be overwhelmed with information and have trouble making any decisions at all.Hall of Fame voting is ultimately designed to be a consensus process. One reason that players tend to gain votes over time is because the writers are looking at what their peers are doing and value the endorsements of their colleagues. Moreover, because they have as many as 15 chances to elect a player, many writers tend toward conservatism initially. There is no way to remove a player from the Hall of Fame once he has been elected, but you can change your mind to include him later. When a writer initially votes “no” on a player, it really means “wait and see” in many cases.But consensus is harder to achieve when members of a group have divergent values and ideologies. Instead of the typical friendly arguments about how a player’s lifetime accomplishments might be weighed against how dominant he was in his best seasons, or how to compare players at different positions, the writers are now spending most of their time arguing about who used steroids and when, and how this should affect Hall of Fame consideration. Many have passionate beliefs about this, whichever side of the argument they take. An increasing number of writers would like to elect a dozen or more players; an increasing number would like to lose the whole “steroids era” to history. Good-natured debates may be replaced by tactical considerations, as voters make guesses about who everyone else might vote for, or where their ballots might be wasted.Next year will place even more pressure on the voters, when Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Frank Thomas and Mike Mussina are added to the list of candidates. Those who apply little discount for steroids use may credibly claim to identify 15 or more qualified candidates, and even those who do not may have to drop one or two names that they otherwise see as worthy. The New York Times will probably not have to publish a blank page again, but no one but Maddux seems sure to make it in.,Jessie Schwartz for The New York Times Baseball writers elected no one to the Hall of Fame on Wednesday, despite what might have been the deepest ballot in years.The failure of the writers to pick Barry Bonds or Roger Clemens was not a surprise given the low vote totals received in the past by Mark McGwire and Rafael Palmeiro, other players associated with the use performance-enhancing drugs. But the vote totals for Bonds and Clemens, just 36 and 38 percent, were lower than expected.Craig Biggio, who received 68.2 percent of the vote in his first year of eligibility, will almost certainly make it into the Hall of Fame someday. Still, his profile is quite similar to Robin Yount and Roberto Alomar, two players who did better in their first year on the ballot. (Yount got 77.5 percent of the vote in his first year on the ballot in 1999, while Alomar got 73.7 percent of the vote in 2010 and made it in the next year.)Perhaps the clearest effect of the crowded ballot, however, was realized among candidates who were returning to the ballot from last year. Of the 13 players who carried over from the 2012 ballot, nine received a lower share of the vote, including Lee Smith, Alan Trammell, Fred McGriff, Don Mattingly and Bernie Williams.This is atypical; instead, players usually add votes with each additional year they spend on the ballot. Since 1967, when the Hall of Fame adopted balloting rules similar to the ones it uses now, about two-thirds of holdover players gained ground from their prior year’s vote percentage.It is possible to be a bit more precise about this pattern. Based on an analysis of Hall of Fame voting between 1967 and 2011, I found that the increase in a player’s vote total is typically proportional to his percentage from the previous year. In his second year on the ballot, for example, the typical player’s vote share increases by a multiple of about 1.1.Thus, a player who received 10 percent of the vote in his first year would be expected to receive about 11 percent on his second try, while a player who got 50 percent of the vote would go up to 55 percent.The pace of improvement is typically highest in the first several years that a player spends on the ballot, slowing down once he has been eligible five or six times. (The exception is in a player’s 15 and final year of eligibility, when he may receive a fairly large boost.) But these small percentage gains can add up, something like the way in which interest compounds over time. For example, as shown in the chart below, a player who gets just 30 percent of the vote in his first year on the ballot would be projected to make it in on his 14th year of eligibility if he follows the formula each year.In practice, the growth in a player’s vote share is rarely this smooth — and you should not necessarily expect the pattern to hold for Bonds and Clemens. (Instructively, the vote shares for McGwire and Palmeiro have actually been declining.) Nonetheless, Hall of Fame candidates typically have a tailwind as time passes.This year, however, veterans on the Hall of Fame ballot faced a headwind instead. The next chart compares the actual vote that each player received against that projected by the historical formula. Actual results in 2013 compared to projections based on historical patterns.Twelve of the 13 players underperformed their projection; the exception was Dale Murphy, who got a larger-than-average boost in his final year of eligibility, but still came nowhere close to winning election.Even some players who gained ground did not necessarily help their chances. Jack Morris went from 66.7 percent of the vote to 67.7 percent, below his projection of 69.4 percent. The small difference could be important because next year will be Morris’s final year of eligibility, and he projects to be very close to the 75 percent threshold for election. (Perhaps the player who had the best year, instead, was Tim Raines, whose vote share grew to 52.2 percent from 48.7 percent, and who is now a clear favorite to be elected someday by the writers.)Most other players lost ground outright. Trammell, in his 12th year of eligibility, declined to 33.6 percent from 36.8 percent of the vote. He was an underdog to make it in before, but now he seems to have very little chance. The same also holds for Smith, who lost most of what he gained last year after years of stagnant vote totals.McGriff, as Joe Posnanski writes, seemed to be a plausible candidate to gain ground this year as writers sought out players who were perceived as clean, as opposed to known or suspected of steroid use. Instead, his vote share declined to 20.7 percent from 23.9 percent. Williams had received just under 10 percent of the vote in his first year of eligibility, but his case was not entirely hopeless; players like Bob Lemon and Carl Hubbell were eventually selected by the writers with a similar vote total in their first year.Instead, Williams fell below the 5 percent threshold required for a player to stay on the ballot.The crowded and confusing ballot may be affecting these players in several ways. The most obvious is that the writers are limited to voting for a maximum of 10 players. This year, according to the sample of ballots collected by the Twitter user @leokitty, 24 percent of writers used all 10 of their picks. That compares with 12 percent in 2011, and just 4 percent in 2012.Did the 10-vote limit keep Biggio and Morris out of the Hall of Fame, perhaps along with other players?Actually, it was almost certainly not responsible all by itself. Of the 24 percent of writers who used all 10 ballot slots, 90 percent did name Biggio, meaning 10 percent did not. At best, therefore, if all writers who exhausted their ballots would also have named Biggio if they had unlimited votes, he would have gotten only 10 percent of the 24 percent, adding only 2.4 percentage points to his overall vote total.The logic here is that it’s hard to make a case that Biggio was only the 11th or 12th best player on the ballot. Instead, most of the writers who left him out were probably more like Jon Heyman of CBS Sports. Heyman wrote that he saw Biggio as the eighth best player on the ballot — but he also thought that only six were worthy of inclusion. Most of the writers who left Biggio out, in other words, were those who take a conservative overall approach to how many players they want in the Hall of Fame, and not those who ran out of ballot positions.Morris is a more debatable case. If all writers who maxed out their ballot slots had included him, he would have come very close to 75 percent of the vote. However, Morris is also a highly polarizing candidate. Those writers who included him often thought he was among the very best players on the ballot; on several ballots, in fact, Morris was the only player named. But other writers think he falls fall short of Hall of Fame standards and would not have picked him no matter how many votes they had to spare.Nor, obviously, were Bonds’s and Clemens’s totals affected to any material degree by the 10-player limit. Nobody left Bonds off their ballots because they thought he had only the 11th-best statistical record; they did so because they don’t think steroids users should be in the Hall of Fame. (In fact, most of the writers who maxed out their ballot slots included Bonds and Clemens; the writers who are willing to consider performance-enhancing drug users have much more crowded ballots than those who are not.)Instead, players like McGriff, Trammell, Williams and Edgar Martinez were probably most affected by the 10-player limit. The logic for McGriff, for example, is very close of the opposite of that which might be applied to Biggio. It’s fairly hard to sustain a case that McGriff was one of the best six or seven players on the ballot this year. But you might credibly argue that there is a glut of a dozen or so qualified players, McGriff among them, and you had to leave McGriff out because of the ballot limit.However, the players are not only being affected by those writers who ran out of ballot slots. There were a higher-than-average number of writers this year who listed very few players, or even none at all. Some 10 percent of voters named two or fewer players this year, according to Leokitty’s spreadsheet. That is lower than in 2012, an underwhelming year on the ballot, when 16 percent of voters did so.But it is less than 2009, 2010 or 2011, when between 3 and 8 percent of writers listed so few players. Some writers are deliberately listing very few players as a protest vote, whether against the steroids era or the Hall of Fame balloting process.Between the protest voters on the one hand, and the maxed-out voters on the other, the players are being squeezed at both ends.Finally, some players may be harmed by the psychology of the ballot. If Clemens were not on the ballot, for example, then you could credibly make a case that Curt Schilling was the best pitcher on the ballot (if you don’t think that Morris is). But Schilling’s accomplishments look poor by comparison to Clemens’s, as do those of almost any pitcher — even if you aren’t willing to vote for Clemens because of his steroids use. The same holds for outfielders whose statistics might be compared with Barry Bonds’s.There is even something to be said for the so-called “paradox of choice”: that when presented with too many options, we may be overwhelmed with information and have trouble making any decisions at all.Hall of Fame voting is ultimately designed to be a consensus process. One reason that players tend to gain votes over time is because the writers are looking at what their peers are doing and value the endorsements of their colleagues. Moreover, because they have as many as 15 chances to elect a player, many writers tend toward conservatism initially. There is no way to remove a player from the Hall of Fame once he has been elected, but you can change your mind to include him later. When a writer initially votes “no” on a player, it really means “wait and see” in many cases.But consensus is harder to achieve when members of a group have divergent values and ideologies. Instead of the typical friendly arguments about how a player’s lifetime accomplishments might be weighed against how dominant he was in his best seasons, or how to compare players at different positions, the writers are now spending most of their time arguing about who used steroids and when, and how this should affect Hall of Fame consideration. Many have passionate beliefs about this, whichever side of the argument they take. An increasing number of writers would like to elect a dozen or more players; an increasing number would like to lose the whole “steroids era” to history. Good-natured debates may be replaced by tactical considerations, as voters make guesses about who everyone else might vote for, or where their ballots might be wasted.Next year will place even more pressure on the voters, when Greg Maddux, Tom Glavine, Frank Thomas and Mike Mussina are added to the list of candidates. Those who apply little discount for steroids use may credibly claim to identify 15 or more qualified candidates, and even those who do not may have to drop one or two names that they otherwise see as worthy. The New York Times will probably not have to publish a blank page again, but no one but Maddux seems sure to make it in. read more

Michael B Jordan Isnt Interested In Meeting Michael Jordan

Michel B. Jordan once got star struck upon seeing Michael Jordan. (Catherine Steenkeste/Getty Images/Tim P. Whitby/Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images)Michael B. Jordan has always had fame tied to his name. Without the B, he’s easily confused for NBA great Michael Jordan. Though the two have never met, the “Black Panther” star currently has no interest in changing that anytime soon.“I never met Michael Jordan,” the actor said in the May issue of Men’s Health. “I never want to officially meet him until I’m at a point where he knows who I am and I know who he is. And it would be our mutual respect thing. Until then it would just be a ‘this guy has your name, ha ha.’ I don’t want that. So that pushes me to keep working too. These things motivate me.”Still, it’s not like Jordan hasn’t been close to having an official meeting with the sports icon. He told The Wall Street Journal in January that he saw the baller at NBA All-Star Weekend once and got star struck. And the person who had that effect on Jordan is part of something else that motivated the actor growing up.“I’m competitive. I want to compete in anything I do. That came from my name,” the star of the upcoming big screen adaptation of “Fahrenheit 451” said. “Growing up in sports and having a name like Michael Jordan and being teased, I had to compete. I couldn’t be the guy with the name and not be good at it. That carried over to everything. I’m like, I’ve got to be just as great if not greater than he was in his field.”While Jordan’s reasoning for not wanting to meet MJ just yet may be compelling to some, several Twitter users remained largely unimpressed.“Surprising considering they both chase after White Women,🙄”  a user said.“M’kay,” someone else simply tweeted.“Weird,” another said.“What?!?” someone more enthused exclaimed. read more

Ohio State mens tennis team seeks 1st NCAA championship

The Ohio State men’s tennis team will begin NCAA Tournament action at home Friday. The Buckeyes are going into the tournament as the No. 4 seed, and they will look to bring home their first-ever national title. Sixty-four teams from around the nation were selected May 3 to be part of the 2011 NCAA Championship Tournament. The Buckeyes were one of 31 teams that automatically qualified for the tournament by winning their conference championship. OSU earned that bid May 1, when it clinched its sixth consecutive Big Ten Tournament title in Madison, Wis. OSU will begin the NCAA Tournament with home-field advantage. The team will host Notre Dame, East Tennessee State and Ball State for the first two rounds of the six-round tournament Friday and Saturday. “It’s always much easier to win at home than on the road,” said coach Ty Tucker of the advantage. OSU (30-2) opens the NCAA Tournament against Ball State (15-14). The last time the Buckeyes played the Cardinals was during the 1994–95 season. Overall, OSU is 9-3 against Ball State. “After two weeks off, you have to establish in the first round that you’re ready to play,” Tucker said of the Friday match. If the team advances past the first two rounds, the Buckeyes will travel to Stanford, Calif., to compete. “We need to focus on the first two rounds,” senior co-captain Balazs Novak said. The biggest competitors the Buckeyes could face throughout the tournament are Virginia and USC, Tucker said. OSU lost to Virginia once already this season, 4-1, in February. “There are a lot of good teams,” senior co-captain Matt Allare said. “Virginia hasn’t been beaten at all, and USC are the back-to-back champions.” The last time the Buckeyes made it to the NCAA Tournament finals was in 2009, when they fell to USC, the reigning national champion. “We’re No. 4 in the nation, but you look at other teams and they’re so good,” senior co-captain Shuhei Uzawa said. “We just need to give it everything we’ve got.” Despite the tough competition, OSU’s ultimate goal is to bring home the national title. “That’s one of the three or four goals every year,” Tucker said. “I think that has to be the goal.” Novak said winning the championship title would be a great achievement for the team and that it would mean everything. The first match in Columbus will be between Notre Dame and East Tennessee State at 10 a.m. Friday at the Stickney Tennis Center. read more

Football DreMont Jones selected No 71 overall by Denver in 2019 NFL

Ohio State redshirt junior defensive lineman Dre’Mont Jones (86) leads the Buckeyes out on the field to start the 2018 Spring Game on April 14, 2018. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignOhio State produced its fifth defensive line prospect in two years Friday, when former defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones heard his name called as the No. 71 selection by the Denver Broncos in the 2019 NFL Draft.Jones finished his Ohio State career with 114 tackles (22 TFL), 9.5 sacks, three fumble recoveries and a pick-six this past season against TCU.The former Buckeye earned third-team all-Big Ten honors at defensive tackle in 2017, followed by first-team all-Big Ten honors in 2018.Jones’ redshirt junior season was arguably his best, as he finished with career-highs in tackles for loss (13) and sacks (8.5).The St. Ignatius product declared for the NFL Draft in the weeks prior to Ohio State’s contest against Washington in the Rose Bowl, but still participated in the game. read more

The Best Marta once again rules the world

first_imgThe Brazilian superstar defeated nine other candidates for the FIFA award with nearly 15 percent of the voteWith 14.73 percent of the vote, Orlando Pride and Brazil’s footballer Marta has won The Best FIFA Women’s Player of the year award.The forward beat nine other candidates that were selected on September 3rd of this year.She came on top of Dzsenifer Marozsán and Ada Hegerberg, both players from Lyon Women.Marta has the most honors won by any footballer, man or woman, in the world.She has won the FIFA World Player of the Year award in five occasions.Marta has been playing professionally since the year 2000 when she debuted with Vasco da Gama in her native Brazil.Neymar, BrazilNeymar can win the Ballon d’Or, says Ander Herrera Andrew Smyth – September 13, 2019 An “excited” Ander Herrera believes new Paris Saint-Germain team-mate Neymar is a contender for the Ballon d’Or alongside Kylian Mbappe.She then went to play with Santa Cruz, Umea IK, Los Angeles Sol, Santos, FC Gold Pride, Western New York Flash, and Tyreso FF.Most recently she was three years with FC Rosengard, and since the second semester of 2017 with the Orlando Pride.With Brazil she has played 133 matches, scoring 110 goals.Congratulations, Marta 👑Winner of #TheBest FIFA Women’s Player 2018 🏆#FIFAFootballAwards pic.twitter.com/aCxCn2TIFy— FIFA Women’s World Cup 🇫🇷 (@FIFAWWC) September 24, 2018last_img read more

Police Immigration Raid busts illegal residents

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, November 10, 2016 – Police raided the Five Cays community in the wee hours of Wednesday morning and caught a few illegals with no proof of legal status… they were hoping for more.Press Liaison officer, Kevin Clarke in a media statement said the joint operations with Immigration and the TCI Police will continue and come in the aftermath of a series of Haitian boats making landfall in the northwest part of Providenciales.Photos show the task force in full gear and armed ready to flush out migrants who are wanted by officials; several boats have made landfall undetected by the coastal radar leaving untold numbers of illegal suspected Haitians to run free in the islands.The most recent boat load sparked even greater fears among residents due to a prison break in Haiti and a report from the US Coast Guard that drugs and weapons smuggling is on the rise through the Dominican Republic and Haiti.  That report was given to the National Security Council which includes the Governor and Commissioner of Police.  Police say the joint operations will continue.last_img read more

Bahamian vendors suffer losses after Fyre Festival

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, July 7th 2017 – Nassau – Tourists who expected to have a memorable and fun experience at the failed Fyre Festival in Exuma earlier this year are not the only ones left with repercussions. Minister of Tourism, Dionsio D’Aguilar yesterday confirmed that Bahamian vendors would also have to cut their losses.D’Aguilar called it risky business and said, “The chap went bankrupt.” Adding also, “the event crashed and burned, and you know, that is one of the risks of business. When you go into business there is a possibility of something happening”Fortunately, the minister explained that the government has made some strides in recovering any losses it may have suffered. He revealed that the government was able to seize the container with musical equipment and staging which was used to secure Bahamas custom fees, landing fees, and immigration charges.However, the government does not have the responsibility of reimbursing any of the local vendors who also went into business for the event. Hundreds of tourists expecting to partake in an event advertised to be “one of a kind”, spent thousands of dollars, only to be left stranded on an island in Exuma without as little as food or proper accommodations.Last Friday, CEO of Fyre Festival, William McFarland was arrested and charged with wire fraud. As a result, D’Aguilar said on the former government’s part, due diligence was not done and it is something that should not be repeated going forward.Story By: Kay-Marie Fletcher#MagneticMediaNews Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp ALERT # 2 ON POTENTIAL TROPICAL CYCLONE NINE ISSUED BY THE BAHAMAS DEPARTMENT OF METEOROLOGY THURSDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER, 2019 AT 9 PM EDT Recommended for you Related Items:#magneticmedianews The Luxury of Grace Bay in Down Town Provo Electricity Cost of Service Study among the big agenda items at September 11 Cabinet meetinglast_img read more

School safety training to prevent and resolve active shooter situations

first_img Ed Lenderman Ed Lenderman, Posted: February 15, 2018 School safety training to prevent and resolve active shooter situations 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsKUSI’s Ed Lenderman spoke with the person who oversees school safety for the County Office of Education.Bob Mueller is in-touch with every school district in the county. February 15, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Bob Mueller, County Office of Education FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

CA Attorney General Becerra Lorena Gonzalez announce bill to combat underground economic

first_img Updated: 10:33 AM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter February 22, 2019 Posted: February 22, 2019 KUSI Newsroom center_img CA Attorney General Becerra, Lorena Gonzalez announce bill to combat underground economic crimes 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego, today announced legislation to help the state combat “underground economic crimes” like human trafficking and illegal pharmaceutical schemes.The bill would expand the state’s multi-agency Tax Recovery and Underground Economy team, currently based out of Sacramento and Los Angeles. Investigative teams would be added in San Diego, the Bay Area and Fresno to further delegate the state’s efforts to stop crimes like human trafficking and illegal pharmaceutical schemes.“With underground economic crime, our workers get exploited, business owners face unfair competition, consumers get ripped off, and taxpayers bear the burden,” Becerra said. “AB 1296 expands on successful efforts to prosecute violators and recover funds involved in wage theft, tax evasion, counterfeit commerce and other economic crimes.”Gonzalez cited a recent report by the UCLA Labor Center, which found that the state’s underground economic activity produces between $60 billion and $140 billion each year, all of which goes unreported. Consequently, the state loses roughly $8.5 billion annually in sales and use tax dollars.The state launched the TRUE pilot program in 2014 in its two current cities, which will become permanent law enforcement teams if the bill is codified.Since launching, the program’s investigative teams have identified roughly $482 million in unreported economic activity, a $60 million tax revenue loss.The program has also recovered an additional $25 million in tax revenue and investigation costs, according to Gonzalez’s office.“The underground economy hurts everyone: workers who are left without protection, consumers who are sold dangerous or fake products, and the state as we lose tax money,” she said. “This task force is a unique, collaborative approach for law enforcement to breakdown its usual silos and execute wider solutions for targeting the underground economy.” KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more

Best Way To Save Wildlife Babies Leave Them Alone

first_img“Newborn moose calves aren’t able to run from pets or people on bicycles,” Battle said. “Mothers are likely to stand their ground, even when they hear you coming.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is reminding residents of one important thing, a newborn animal found alone in the woods – or even in your backyard – can appear helpless and abandoned. But don’t be fooled. Destitute as those big-eyed babies may seem, a protective mother is almost always nearby. If a moose calf or bear cub is encountered without its mother immediately in view, be alert in case you’ve walked between them. The best course of action is usually to back away and leave from the direction you came. Also, do not assume young animals found alone are orphaned. Mother moose and bears frequently walk out of sight, cache their young, or become separated from them by fences or roads. Sow bears often send cubs up trees to wait before leaving to find food. In nearly all cases, the mothers return to their young. Bicyclists and runners should be especially alert as they can swiftly top hills or round corners and run into moose, bears and other wildlife. Making noise to alert wildlife to your presence is always a good precaution, but may not be enough to avoid clashes with moose cows with calves. Wildlife Biologist Dave Battle says attacks on people and pets by cows aggressively defending calves are reported each spring: “You’ll want to give moose calves plenty of space.” If you observe a young animal that appears to have been left alone for more than 48 hours, contact the nearest Alaska Department of Fish and Game office during regular business hours, or use the department’s smartphone-friendly link to file a report online by visiting http://www.adfg.alaska.gov and clicking the “Report a Wildlife Encounter” button.last_img read more

Glam Partners with Publishers for New Channel

first_imgMore than 20 Web sites and publishers have joined Glam Media’s new vertical, Glam Wellness, which the online women’s network officially launched today.With the launch of Glam Wellness, Glam’s vertical content network includes six channels, including Style, Living, Entertainment, Health and Family.Boulder, Colorado-based Natural Solutions magazine, along with Earth Pledge, a non-profit, have signed on as Glam Wellness content partners. Web sites that have joined include EcoFabulous, EatingWell and Lifescript.The Wellness channel will be headed by Joe Lagani, former publisher of Condé Nast’s House & Garden, with Glam co-founder and Wellness Director Rebecca Arora. In May, Glam became the latest media company to launch a video and distribution platform with GlamTV, which allows sharing of video content from its network of more than 500 women’s fashion and lifestyle Web sites.last_img read more

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY Volunteers Needed For The Moving Wall Visit

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Volunteers are needed as “Wall Walkers” when The Moving Wall comes to the Wilmington Town Common later this month.There will be 2-hour volunteer shifts, with 4 volunteers per shift, from the morning of Thursday, July 26 through the morning of Monday, July 30.During their 2-hour shift, volunteers are generally asked to be visible attendants by watching the wall and assisting vistors with questions, finding names, rubbings and other questions.  Attendants can take turns sitting in the Visitor Tent providing name and panel locations from the provided lists and physically walking along the wall to ensure all visitors are able to get a positive experience.Sign up for a 2-hour volunteer shift online HERE.(NOTE: The above information is from The Moving Wall’s Facebook page.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedVOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY: Volunteers Wanted For Wilmington Fun on the Fourth CelebrationIn “Community”VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY: Town Seeking Volunteers For Open Space CommitteeIn “Government”VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY: WOW Seeking Volunteers For 5K Run for Wilmington/Kim Forte Walk THIS SundayIn “Community”last_img read more

SCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS Big Issues To Be Discussed At Tonights Meeting September 26

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington School Committee meets this Wednesday, September 26, 2018 at 7pm in the Large Instruction Room at Wilmington High School.There are some newsworthy items on the agenda, including:The School Committee will receive a presentation from WHS Principal Linda Peters regarding the school’s upcoming NEASC accreditation.The School Committee will receive a presentation from Diana Hill on the district’s 2019 Special Olympics.The School Committee will receive a presentation from Laura Stinson & Officer Brian Moon on the district’s Walking School Bus Program for the 2018-2019 school year.The School Committee will receive a presentation from Sue MacDonald on the district’s English Language Learners update.The Superintendent will discuss next steps following last meeting’s discussion on developing a policy for the formation of new sports teams.The School Committee will accept a $500 donation for Wilmington High School extracurricular activities from Wilmington Pediatrics.The School Committee will select its delegate to the Massachusetts Association of School Committees.The School Committee will receive the FY18 Final Revolving Account Report and a personnel report.The School Committee will continue to discuss its operating protocols.The School Committee will receive a report from the Superintendent, plus subcommittee reports and any public comments.The meeting will be telecast live by Wilmington Community Television on WCTV-G — Channel 22 on Comcast and Channel 38 on Verizon.  The meeting will also streamed on WCTV’s website HERE.Wilmington Apple intends on reporting on many of the items above – and any other news that comes from the meeting.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS: Homework, Bullying, Vaping, Grants, Gymnastics & More To Be Discussed At June 12 MeetingIn “Education”SCHOOL COMMITTEE To Discuss New School Year, New Administrators & New Goals At August 28 MeetingIn “Education”Superintendent Brand Announces His TEN Goals For The 2019-2020 School YearIn “Education”last_img read more