Environmental Awards by DEMA this weekend

first_img 40 Honored at DECR Stewardship Awards Related Items:dema, environmental awards, henry wilson, world environment day, world ocean day Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 04 Jun 2015 – Thirty five environmental champions will be awarded this weekend when the Department of Environment and Maritime affairs hosts the annual Environmental Stewardship Awards. Acting Director of DEMA, Henry Wilson says: “DEMA takes this opportunity every year to honour those individuals and organisations that have kindly contributed their time, equipment and/or financial assistance to DEMA throughout the year, in order to promote conservation and an environmentally sustainable TCI.” This entire event will unfold in concert with World Environment Day and World Oceans Day on June 5th and 8th respectively… Wilson adds that if you want to be a Community Conservation Partner to contact DEMA. Recommended for you Climate Change blamed for seawater woes in Grand Turk Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Emergency action in Grand Turk due to sea surgeslast_img read more

Afghan leaders Taliban attend peace talks in Moscow

first_imgRepresentatives of the Taliban arrive to attend international talks on Afghanistan in Moscow on 9 November. Photo: AFPMoscow on Friday hosted international talks on Afghanistan aimed at kickstarting direct negotiations between Kabul and the Taliban militant group, both of whom sent delegations.Russia hopes “through joint efforts to open a new page in the history of Afghanistan,” Russian foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said as the talks opened at a Moscow hotel on Friday morning.He said that the participation of both Afghan leaders and the Taliban was an “important contribution” aimed at creating “favourable conditions for the start of direct talks.””I am counting on you holding a serious and constructive conversation that will justify the hopes of the Afghan people,” he said before the talks continued behind closed doors.Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid told AFP that the militant group was sending five representatives.They will not hold “any sort of negotiations” with the delegation of Kabul administration, he said.”This conference is not about holding negotiations with any party whatsoever — rather it is about finding a peaceful solution to the issue of Afghanistan,” he added.This is the first time that a Taliban delegation is taking part in such high-level international meeting, Russian foreign ministry spokeswoman Maria Zakharova said Thursday.The Taliban is banned from operating Russia as it is classified as a “terrorist organisation”.The Afghan delegation is made up of four representatives of the High Peace Council, a government body responsible for reconciliation efforts with the militants, spokesman Sayed Ihsan Taheri said.The Afghan foreign ministry has emphasised that the council does not represent the Afghan government at the meeting, however.Moscow said it had invited representatives from the United States as well as India, Iran, China, Pakistan and five former Soviet republics in Central Asia.Pakistan, which has long been accused of providing support to the Afghan Taliban, would “definitely” attend, foreign ministry spokesman Muhammad Faisal told AFP.The US embassy in Moscow was sending a representative to observe the discussions.The Moscow meeting was initially scheduled to take place in September but was postponed after Kabul insisted that the process should be Afghan-led.The meeting comes at a sensitive time.Newly appointed US peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad has been trying to convince the Taliban to agree to negotiate an end to the war and there are fears the Russian meeting could derail those efforts.A US government watchdog last week said Kabul’s control of Afghanistan had slipped in recent months as local security forces suffered record casualties while making minimal or no progress against the Taliban.last_img read more

Supreme Court Strikes Down Part Of Immigration Law

first_img Share Drew Angerer/Getty ImagesPresident Trump has hailed his appointment of Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court, but Gorsuch sided against the administration Tuesday in an immigration case.The U.S. Supreme Court declared a clause in federal law, requiring the deportation of immigrants convicted of a “crime of violence,” unconstitutionally vague Tuesday.It’s a blow to the Trump Justice Department and came at the hands, ironically, of conservative Justice Neil Gorsuch, who sided with the court’s liberals in a 5-4 decision.In 2015, the court also held that a clause alluding to a “violent felony” in the Armed Career Criminal Act was unconstitutionally vague.For background on the case, Sessions v. Dimaya, here’s Oyez‘s summary:“James Garcia Dimaya, a native and citizen of the Philippines, was admitted to the United States as a lawful permanent resident in 1992. In 2007 and 2009, Dimaya was convicted under the California Penal Code for first-degree residential burglary; both convictions resulted in two years’ imprisonment. Under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA), a non-citizen convicted of an aggravated felony is subject to deportation. The INA definition of  aggravated felony includes a ‘crime of violence,’ which is any offense that involves the use or substantial risk of physical force against another person or property.The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) subsequently initiated deportation proceedings against Dimaya and claimed that his burglary convictions constituted crimes of violence under the Act. The Immigration Judge held that Dimaya was deportable and that burglary constitutes a crime of violence because it always involves a risk of physical violence. The Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) affirmed.“While Dimaya’s appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit was pending, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Johnson v. United States, which held  that the definition of a ‘violent felony’ in the Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA) was unconstitutionally vague. As a result, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit held that the INA’s crime of violence provision was unconstitutionally vague because it was largely similar to the violent felony provision in the ACCA that the Supreme Court struck down in Johnson. The appellate court found that both provisions denied fair notice to defendants and failed to make clear when a risk of violence could be considered substantial.”Overseas emails case vacatedAlso, given that President Trump signed the CLOUD Act, the court officially vacated the major U.S. v. Microsoft case dealing with whether email stored in servers abroad could be compelled to be turned over to law enforcement.That move was largely expected at some point.Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more