Police Immigration Raid busts illegal residents

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, TCI, November 10, 2016 – Police raided the Five Cays community in the wee hours of Wednesday morning and caught a few illegals with no proof of legal status… they were hoping for more.Press Liaison officer, Kevin Clarke in a media statement said the joint operations with Immigration and the TCI Police will continue and come in the aftermath of a series of Haitian boats making landfall in the northwest part of Providenciales.Photos show the task force in full gear and armed ready to flush out migrants who are wanted by officials; several boats have made landfall undetected by the coastal radar leaving untold numbers of illegal suspected Haitians to run free in the islands.The most recent boat load sparked even greater fears among residents due to a prison break in Haiti and a report from the US Coast Guard that drugs and weapons smuggling is on the rise through the Dominican Republic and Haiti.  That report was given to the National Security Council which includes the Governor and Commissioner of Police.  Police say the joint operations will continue.last_img read more

Fords Shelby GT500 leverages supercomputers to go fast and stay cool

first_img 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 is a friendlier brawler 2020 Porsche 718 Spyder first drive: A Boxster with way more bite 0 Enlarge ImageThe GT500 is the most powerful Mustang ever and keeping it cool at wide open throttle requires some seriously smart design. Ford Ford’s forthcoming GT500 Mustang promises to be the fastest and most technologically advanced Mustang ever. To help with the “fastest” part of that equation, the GT500 has a supercharged V8 that produces more than 700 horsepower on 93-octane pump fuel. The technological part requires a bit more explaining.See, one of the unfortunate byproducts of producing all that sweet, sweet horsepower is the production of massive amounts of heat. How massive? Try more than 230 kilowatts — that’s more than 784,000 BTUs per hour, in old money. Getting rid of that heat efficiently and in a way that doesn’t compromise the GT500’s aerodynamics is a fairly complicated problem to solve. So complicated that Ford opted to involve a few supercomputers to help.All cars are cooled by air, and managing how that air moves through the various cooling devices determines how efficiently they can do their job. Of course, on a car like the GT500, you have a radiator to keep the engine itself cool. Then you have an intercooler which helps drop the temperature of the air that the engine breathes. mustang-2Enlarge ImageFord’s supercomputers use their vast amounts of processing power to help determine the optimum shape for cooling and aero on Ford’s fastest Mustangs. Ford On their own, packaging these inside the aggressively-styled nose of the Mustang takes a little finesse. Each needs to be large enough to do its job, but small enough to leave room for the other cooling pack components. The GT500 has air conditioning, so that means a condenser is mounted in front of the radiator, then there is a transmission cooler, an engine oil cooler and so on.Each of these matrices is a different thickness and causes an obstruction to incoming air that affects the component behind it. This is where the supercomputer comes in. First, the computer helps find the optimum size and shape of the grille area for the Mustang, and then it will help determine the ideal placement and size of the various cooling components.Now, with the engine’s need for air satiated, the supercomputer calculates the flow through the grille, the cooling components, and out of the hood vent, the cowl and other ducts in the car. These all affect the car’s wind resistance and the amount of aerodynamic downforce the vehicle produces.mb-2537Enlarge ImageThis is the GT500’s aero buck. It’s a test mule that Ford’s designers can use to quickly check any potential aerodynamic changes. It’s not pretty, but it’s helpful. Ford The temperature of the air coming out of these ducts affects this as well. As you’d imagine, air coming out of the hood vent is good and hot after having gone through a half-dozen radiators and around a massive roaring engine. The supercomputer accounts for this.Of course, not even a supercomputer can nail things on the first go so the ability to rapidly design, model, and then build and test parts in a wind tunnel and then on-track is critical. To that end, Ford employed the use of in-house 3D printers that allowed its engineers to design, for example, new winglets that mount on the bumper to increase front downforce. Ford ended up going through more than 10 different designs for these “splitter wickers” before finding the right one.Long gone are the days of the Ford Thunderbolt, when making a faster car meant taking a standard car, stripping weight out of it, tossing in the biggest engine you had and telling the customer good luck if they had problems. Ford understands that not only does its GT500 have to go like hell on a race track or a drag strip, but it also has to start every time you push the button. Based on the engineering that Ford’s showing us here, it looks like we have plenty to be excited about come summertime. 2019 Chevy Camaro ZL1 Convertible review: A topless thrill ride 2019 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350 first drive: A more approachable track star 98 Photos Share your voicecenter_img Ford Post a comment Tags Performance Cars Auto Tech Supercomputers Ford More From Roadshowlast_img read more

RollsRoyce reveals 47000 Champagne Chest just in time for summer

first_img Car Culture Superluxury Cars Rolls-Royce 39 Photos More about 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan Review • 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan review: The top-shelf SUV 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan review: The top-shelf SUV News • I’m taking the 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan on the 7-day off-road Rebelle Rally 1 Enlarge ImageRolls-Royce says the chest is “suitable for the most extravagant of environments from a superyacht to the terrace of a private residence.” Rolls-Royce If you drive a Rolls-Royce, it looks a little gauche to show up at a garden party with your beverages in an old tote bag or cheap cooler. To that end, the British luxury marque on Thursday revealed its new Champagne Chest, an extravagant way to keep your champagne and caviar cool — and looking glamorous.The Champagne Chest is constructed from carbon fiber and aluminum, over which are layers of leather and wood. The chest pops open at the touch of a button, revealing a champagne set for four, including four cotton napkins. The crystal champagne flutes are hand-blown glass, with the “RR” monogram etched. The chest’s Tudor oak wood lid, meanwhile, becomes a serving tray.Rolls-Royce Champagne ChestEnlarge ImageThe champagne flutes are arranged in a pattern “to evoke memories of a V12 engine,” the company says. Rolls-Royce At either side of the chest, “hammocks” deploy, containing either a bottle of champagne, caviar or other canapés, Rolls-Royce says. Special insulated champagne holders, again made from carbon fiber and aluminum, keep your bubbly at precisely the correct temperature.Champagne not your thing? Rolls-Royce will also offer the chest in a caviar-specific configuration, with two 30-gram containers, as well as mother-of-pearl spoons. Caviar not to your liking? You can also elect to equip the chest with a container featuring three porcelain bowls, “should patrons wish to present their guests with an alternative accompaniment to champagne,” the company says.The Champagne Chest can be yours from £37,000, or about $47,350, from any Rolls-Royce dealership. The company notes that, of course, customers can customize the color of the chest to their exact specifications, in the same way buyers can choose every aspect of the design of their new car. Tagscenter_img 2016 Mercedes-Maybach S600 review: Let it semi-autonomously chauffeur your chauffeur 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan in the wilds of Wyoming Comment More From Roadshow Preview • 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan: Elevating the SUV Share your voice 2019 Rolls-Royce Cullinan: Elevating the SUV Rolls Roycelast_img read more

India squad for West Indies tour announced 3 surprising omissions from squad

first_imgThe speculations will not relent anytime soon, but well, MS Dhoni is not travelling with the Indian team which travels to West Indies. Chief selector spoke about grooming Rishabh Pant for the role across all the three formats and the young man has been picked in all three Indian squads. Also, Wriddhiman Saha makes a comeback to the Test side after achieving fitness.There was a continuation in the selection process and while few key players were rested owing to workload management, the nucleus of the Indian team remains in place. There are also new faces in the limited-overs side as Shreyas Iyer and Manish Pandey were rewarded for their impressive performances in the ongoing ‘A’ series against West Indies.However, there were a few names which were expected to be called up, but have missed out. We take a look at 3 surprising omissions from the Indian squad.Shubman Gill Shubman GillHarry Trump/Getty ImagesThe young man was mighty impressive for Kolkata Knight Riders in the IPL this year and has continued his good form against West Indies A at the top of the order. He was tipped to be included in the limited-overs side but does not make the cut. Chief selector MSK Prasad said that Gill was included for the tour of New Zealand as a replacement of KL Rahul and now that the seasoned opener is back, Gill will have to wait for his chance.KS Bharat Srikar BharatFacebookThe young wicket-keeper from Andhra Pradesh was very close to getting the nod as per MSK Prasad, but then they went with Wriddhiman Saha as per an ‘unwritten’ rule which sees the inclusion of a senior player who was out injured but has regained his fitness.”We have taken India A performances into consideration. In the longer format, KS Bharat was very, very close to getting selected. We have an unwritten norm when a senior cricketer is injured, he should get a comeback opportunity. That’s what we have given to Saha,” MSK Prasad said.Mayank Agarwal Mayank AgarwalMichael Dodge/Getty ImagesMayank Agarwal, who was roped in as Vijay Shankar’s replacement at the World Cup but then did not any game time, has not been considered in the limited-overs squads. Instead, the selectors have gone ahead and picked Shreyas Iyer and Manish Pandey to shore up the options in the middle order.last_img read more

PM reaches Nepal to attend BIMSTEC Summit

first_imgA VVIP flight of Biman Bangladesh Airlines carrying the prime minister and her entourage left Hazrat Shahjalal International Airport for Kathmandu at 8:05am, reports UNB.The flight landed at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu at 9:05 am local time (9:20am Bangladesh time).Sheikh Hasina was escorted to Hotel Soaltee Crowne Plaza at Tahachal Marg in Kathmandu by a ceremonial motorcade where she will be staying during her visit.Later in the day, the permier will meet Nepalese president Bidya Devi Bhandari at Sheetal Nibash, the Presidential Palace, in the capital city.She will also attend a luncheon there to be hosted by the Nepalese president.In the afternoon, the Bangladesh prime minister along with other leaders will attend the opening session of the 4th BIMSTEC Summit at Hotel Soaltee Crowne Plaza.In the evening, she will hold a meeting with her Indian counterpart Narendra Modi.Hasina and other leaders will also join a gala dinner to be hosted by Nepalese prime minister KP Sharma Oli in the city’s Hyatt Regency Hotel in the evening.The prime minister is expected to return home on Friday noon. Prime minister Sheikh Hasina. File PhotoPrime minister Sheikh Hasina reached Kathmandu on a two-day official visit to Nepal to attend the 4th BIMSTEC Summit.The Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation (BIMSTEC) having seven member states — Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Myanmar and Thailand — came into being on 6 June 1997 through the Bangkok Declaration.last_img read more

Porn star sues Trump over hush deal

first_imgDonald TrumpA porn star sued President Donald Trump on Tuesday to declare a “hush agreement” over their alleged affair invalid because he never signed it, documents say.Los Angeles lawyer Michael Avenatti posted on his Twitter account a copy of what appears to be the suit filed on behalf of the porn star who goes by the name Stormy Daniels. Her real name is Stephanie Clifford.The hush agreement does “not exist, because, among other things, Mr Trump never signed” the document with a Superior Court of California stamp, the suit says.It alleges she had an intimate relationship with Trump from 2006 to 2007, which she sought to reveal after Trump won the Republican Party nomination for president and other women claimed to have had sexual encounters with him.With help from his lawyer Michael Cohen, Trump then sought to “aggressively… silence Ms Clifford as part of an effort to avoid her telling the truth, thus helping to ensure he won the presidential election,” the document says.Cohen prepared a non-disclosure agreement, a copy of which is attached to the lawsuit and which required a $130,000 payment to be wired from a company known as Essential Consultants LLC to Clifford in return for her silence, according to the documents.Using the pseudonyms Peggy Peterson and David Dennison, Clifford and Trump were to sign the agreement, along with Essential Consultants.Days before the November 2016 presidential election which Trump won, Clifford put her name to the document, as did Cohen for Essential Consultants, it says.“Mr. Trump, however, did not sign the agreement, thus rendering it legally null and void and of no consequence,” the document adds.Cohen told US media last month that he paid Clifford $130,000, prompting her manager to suggest a non-disclosure agreement had been broken.Cohen declined to give details such as why he made the payment, or if Trump was aware of it at the time.“Neither the Trump Organization nor the Trump campaign was a party to the transaction with Ms Clifford, and neither reimbursed me for the payment, either directly or indirectly,” Cohen said, according to the New York Times.Trump declined to comment on the issue. The White House has dodged questions about whether allegations of an affair are true, claiming the matter was dealt with during the campaign.Cohen’s comments came after the watchdog group Common Cause filed a federal complaint in January arguing that the payout may have violated campaign finance rules.last_img read more

Inside the progressive movement roiling Democratic Party

first_imgDemocratic Party logoIn another year, Donna Shalala might have had an easy ride to Washington.Running to become a first-time congresswoman in a Miami seat at age 77, Shalala has long been a member of the Democratic Party elite, with a deep resume that includes supervising US health policy for former president Bill Clinton. Her slogan, printed on the back of her staff’s t-shirts, could have come from Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign playbook: “Ready on Day One.”But this season, Shalala’s record has put her at odds with the surging progressive wing of the Democratic Party. Once derided as the most liberal member of the Clinton administration, Shalala now faces attacks from challengers who contend she is not nearly progressive enough.Taking nothing for granted, Shalala delivered hot dogs to voters at a campaign barbeque on a recent steamy Saturday. “I’m running like I’m 20 points behind,” she said.Less than three months before the midterm elections, a rising progressive movement is roiling the Democratic Party – fueled by fury at Republican president Donald Trump’s administration, a growing populism among voters impatient for seismic change, and resentment of party leaders who have presided over a losing streak in national elections.Republicans disparage Democratic progressives as wild-eyed radicals led by a 28-year-old political neophyte, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, whose take-down of senior Democratic leader and 10-term incumbent Congressman Joe Crowley in a June 26 New York contest rocked Washington.“We have a Democratic party that’s lurching far to the left,” said Representative Steve Stivers, chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee. Michael Byerly, a spokesman for the Congressional Leadership Fund, another Republican group, predicted Democrats’ “ultra-progressive views” will be a hard sell with middle-class voters.Yet Ocasio-Cortez is only the most visible symbol of a grassroots insurgency that has sprung up across the country, including in spots far from deep-blue Democratic strongholds. Most embracing the progressive label share a disdain for corporate money in politics and favor more government-run healthcare, subsidies for college tuition and wage hikes for laborers.Progressives have a mixed record in early nominating contests, more often than not losing to more mainstream Democrats.But they have moved the party sharply to the left, particularly on expanding the government role in healthcare, a Reuters review of Democratic positions in the most competitive congressional races found.Across 41 battleground House of Representatives districts, two-thirds of Democratic nominees want to expand the government’s role in healthcare, the review shows. About a dozen support “Medicare for All,” for many a reference to a single-payer system that would largely replace private insurance. In Congress, most House Democrats support a Medicare for All bill, with six members of the Blue Dog caucus of fiscally conservative Democrats signing on as co-sponsors.Much of the progressive movement has its roots in the nationwide volunteer network built by Bernie Sanders’ 2016 presidential run. Several groups that sprang from the failed Sanders campaign are now pushing for progressive candidates in the midterms – including Brand New Congress, formed two years ago on the dream of running hundreds of progressive political newcomers to oust establishment incumbents, Democrats and Republicans alike.In some ways, the splintering in the Democratic Party is simply a new round in the 2016 fight between Clinton and Sanders supporters. Progressive insurgents believe Clinton’s defeat, on top of losing control of Congress and most state governments, proved them right. They aspire to overthrow conventional wisdom that Democrats must stay safely in the middle to compete.“Democrats have been fixated for 20 years on this elusive, independent, mythical middle of the road voter that did not exist,” said Crystal Rhoades, head of the Democratic Party in Nebraska’s Douglas County, where a progressive candidate, Kara Eastman, is trying to wrest a competitive congressional district from a Republican.“We’re going to try bold ideas.”THE MOVEMENT’S BEGINNINGSThe push for a progressive takeover of Congress began long before Trump won office.One audacious plan began to take hold in early 2016, as a crew of organizers for Sanders’ presidential campaign traveled the country, staging revival-style rallies.The crew included Zack Exley, a veteran political and tech consultant who cut his teeth as an organizer in union fights in Detroit; Saikat Chakrabarti, a technology consultant who started as a volunteer in an online group called Coders for Sanders; Alexandra Rojas, a just-turned 21-year-old college student who was working three jobs; and Corbin Trent, who was selling gourmet burgers in Morristown, Tennessee.“I asked the wife if I could sell the food truck and go to work for Bernie,” Trent said. A month and a half later, he was hired on.When it became clear Sanders would lose, supporters shifted to a new mission. “What if we could do exactly the same thing, not only for president, but Congress, all at once?” asked Chakrabarti.Brand New Congress was launched in April 2016 with a goal of recruiting 400 candidates, all political outsiders with a record of community activism who would run on a single populist platform. Scornful of the Democratic Party hierarchy and the influence of big-money donors, the founders vowed to stay independent of any party – even if it meant finding progressives willing to run as Republicans.“We have to think big or go home,” said Isra Allison, a Sanders volunteer from Charlotte, North Carolina.They toured the country and put out a call for nominations of candidates; more than 10,000 poured in.One name that surfaced: Ocasio-Cortez, a bartender from the Bronx nominated by her brother. Allison called her the day after Christmas, and a couple months later Exley and Chakrabarti met the fledgling candidate over a Thai dinner in lower Manhattan.“I wasn’t sure what to make of her,” Chakrabarti said. “She was too articulate, I think is exactly what I told Zack.” But the advocates quickly realized they were sharing a meal with a potential game-changer.They looked for others. At weekend “boot camps,” candidates were coached in the basics of electioneering, and thrashed out a platform including Medicare for All, a $15 per hour minimum wage and free college tuition. Another bold idea, to abolish US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ICE, surfaced at a Brand New Congress event in 2017.Soon the group was swamped by the challenge of vetting so many candidates – and convincing promising aspirants they could win.There were other problems. After Trump’s polarizing election, the notion that progressives could transcend partisan politics faded, and Brand New Congress began to struggle with fundraising. The group was told it couldn’t use ActBlue, the popular Democratic fundraising platform, if it backed candidates running as Republicans, Trent said.“It was like pushing a rock up a hill,” Trent said.Many of the original BNC people, including Exley, Trent, Chakrabarti and Rojas, abandoned the nonpartisan idea to join Justice Democrats, formed in early 2017 with a mission to rebuild the party to align with a progressive agenda. Others stayed behind at the BNC. “I didn’t want to work with any organization that had a political affiliation,” said Allison.The two organizations tried sharing a political action committee, but separated entirely last October. Trent and Chakrabarti now work for Ocasio-Cortez’ campaign.Overall, Justice Democrats endorsed 68 House candidates, including some originally recruited by the BNC: 21 won primaries or made it to the general election, 37 lost, two dropped out and eight are in races yet to be decided.Still, the BNC founders cite the Ocasio-Cortez breakthrough as a sign of what is possible.“I think now when we approach people for 2020, they’re going to think we’re a little less nuts,” Trent said.MULTIPLE MOVEMENTSBrand New Congress and Justice Democrats are just two players in a movement where different groups with different agendas jostle for donations and influence in the midterms. Some, like Democracy for America and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee, were in place years before the Sanders campaign.California billionaire Tom Steyer, the Democrats’ largest donor, has spent millions of his own money on NextGen America, a group that aims to mobilize young voters. The hedge-fund manager turned activist vows to build the largest progressive operation in America.“The overwhelming number of people whatever their particular affiliation – whether Republican or Democrat or independent – feel as if the political establishment is not hearing them,” he said. The result, he says, is low turnout – particularly by young people who lean toward Democrats.With his fiery calls to impeach Trump, Steyer is among the progressives butting heads with leaders of the Democratic Party’s establishment, who fear turning off moderate voters.This year, progressives have complained about the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which recruits candidates, fundraises and helps plan campaigns for Democrats vying for House seats. In some competitive districts, the DCCC has intervened to back more centrist candidates, ones they consider more electable.The DCCC focuses on finding candidates with records that fit their districts, a spokeswoman said. “The DCCC has long valued the unprecedented influence that the grassroots have in these races,” said communications director Meredith Kelly.Leon Panetta, who served 16 years in Congress and then as a top official in the Clinton and Obama administrations, said Democrats are “going through turmoil” trying to settle on a vision.“Very frankly, it’s a party of a lot of very different voices right now,” Panetta said.Others downplay the notion of a civil war. Elaine Kamarck, among the founders of the New Democrat movement that helped move the party away from liberal policies in the 1990s, now analyzes the midterms as a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. She found most primaries in competitive districts were captured by centrist candidates.Kamarck, who also served as a super delegate for Clinton in 2016, says Democrats need to appeal to moderate voters if they hope to retake Congress. She calls the idea that unabashed progressivism can win in Republican-tilting districts the political equivalent of “repealing the laws of physics.”“I find myself doing a lot of eye-rolling,” she said. “There’s always the argument in the Democratic Party, if only we had really liberal candidates, we would do better. It has never been true before.”Could this year be different? “We’ll see.”THE RACE IN NEBRASKAOne race that may help answer the question is in Omaha, where Eastman will try to unseat a Republican incumbent, Don Bacon, in a district with 13,000 more Republicans than Democrats.Unlike the rest of deeply Republican Nebraska, though, Democrats have been able to win in this district, which stretches from the gentrifying neighborhoods of Omaha, now attracting a surge of millennials, to conservative-leaning suburban neighborhoods near Offutt Air Force Base, where Bacon once served as commanding officer. Obama narrowly won the district in 2008; Trump took it by two points in 2016.Eastman, a nonprofit executive, was considered by the party establishment as far too liberal for Nebraska. She supported a single-payer healthcare system that would replace private insurance, and a list of other progressive causes: tough gun rules, support for abortion rights, a $15 minimum wage.Democratic state and national party leaders mostly lined up behind Brad Ashford, a moderate one-time Republican who already represented the district for one term. Thanks in part to backing from the DCCC and other national groups, Ashford had far more money.The Eastman campaign said it knocked on 60,000 doors. On 15 May, she won by 3 percentage points. After the primary, the DCCC added her to its “Red to Blue” list, along with other progressives who beat establishment candidates.Seeking to pummel Eastman, the Congressional Leadership Fund, a group working in swing districts to protect the GOP majority, has opened a field office in Omaha and already purchased $1.6 million worth of ads, while the Republican National Committee calls her an “out of touch, single-payer touting radical.” One CLF ad chides Eastman for her teenage membership in a band with an obscene name – Pieces of Fuck.Eastman’s positions “might work in some districts in California, but it’s not representative of Nebraska 2,” said Courtney Alexander, CLF communications director.Eastman says Omaha voters are not scared by “pragmatic and common-sense” ideas to remake the healthcare system. She believes the key to winning districts like hers is inspiring more Democrats to turn out – not running as a “Republican-light” moderate.“When they lose, we say, ‘See? Democrats can’t win here,’ ” she said. “We have to get people inspired to vote, and just running against Donald Trump is not enough.”THE FIGHT IN MIAMIThe same debate is playing out this summer in South Florida, where the progressive insurgency has touched off a raucous fight between Democratic hopefuls in Florida’s Congressional District 27, which includes trendy Miami Beach, affluent Coral Gables and Little Havana’s Hispanic immigrants.Represented for three decades by a retiring Cuban-American Republican, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, the district favored Hillary Clinton by nearly 20 percentage points in 2016. It’s considered perhaps the easiest takeover target for Democrats in the country, though nine Republicans are running, including former Miami-Dade County Commissioner Bruno Barreiro and television journalist Maria Elvira Salazar.Four Democrats have challenged Shalala in the August 28 primary. One, David Richardson, has attacked Shalala as a “corporate” Democrat who “sold out progressive values,” running ads slamming her for serving on the board of UnitedHealth Group and for once telling a comedian she opposed universal healthcare. Shalala says it was a joke.A state representative, Richardson has won the endorsement of progressive groups including Our Revolution 305 in Miami and the Congressional Progressive Caucus – caucus co-chair Wisconsin Representative Mark Pocan campaigned with him Friday – and boasts of raising more than $900,000 in small-dollar donations. Progressive support has helped him match Shalala in fundraising – although both are wealthy and each pumped $500,000 into their campaigns.Matt Haggman, a former Miami Herald reporter who also is running, broadcast a TV commercial calling for the abolishment of ICE, the federal agency under fire for separating immigrant children from their parents on the US-Mexico border. “This is a moment when our politics are fundamentally broken, and this must be a moment of renewal,” he said.That idea has begun to catch on with Democratic voters across the country, who are now evenly split on whether to abolish the border control agency formed after the September 11, 2001, attacks, a Reuters/Ipsos poll found. The same poll shows how the idea of expanding Medicare has won wide support among Democratic voters – and even many Republicans.The Democrats’ best-known contender is Shalala, the former University of Miami president who once ran the Clinton Foundation. Some voters say they view her establishment ties with suspicion.“I am definitely looking for more of a new guard,” said Scott Silverman, a 37-year-old actuary who met Haggman during a canvassing session in Palmetto Bay, a neighborhood of spacious ranch homes with lush yards and the occasional peacock in the road.Silverman blames the party’s leaders for Trump. “The fact that they couldn’t beat him says something about the establishment of the Democratic Party.”The first Democrat to enter the race was Michael Hepburn, another of the original candidates recruited by Brand New Congress. Hepburn left his job as a college adviser to campaign full time. He hoped to raise money together with his fellow candidates, but that idea didn’t work out, and his latest campaign report showed him down to his last $434. Most days, he takes public transportation to working-class neighborhoods to knock on doors. During a recent debate, he donned boxing gloves.“Everybody sounds bold. Everybody sounds progressive now,” Hepburn said.Even Shalala is claiming the label, calling herself a “pragmatic progressive.” She said she supports a version of “Medicare for All,” allowing people of all ages the option to buy into an improved model of the government program currently available to older Americans, or keep private insurance. The idea would have seemed a liberal pipe dream in the 1990s, when she helped lead Clinton’s doomed effort to pass healthcare reform.“I’m just pragmatic, because I have run a health care system and because I have seen politics at the national level,” she said. “It doesn’t mean that I am not a progressive or don’t want to see the system evolve. … But we have to get there.”last_img read more

Quantum guessing game reveals insight into strongerthanquantum correlations

first_img(PhysOrg.com) — In information processing, physicists are often in search of ways to turn classical strategies into quantum ones, with the implication that the quantum version is somehow stronger, faster, or more secure than its classical counterpart. However, quantum strategies do not always perform better than classical ones. As a case in point, a new study has compared the strength of classical and quantum correlations in a simple number guessing game and found no difference in performance. Further, the physicists found that a third form of correlations – post-quantum correlations – could outperform both quantum and classical forms. Post-Quantum Correlations: Exploring the Limits of Quantum Nonlocality More information: Mafalda L. Almeida, et al. “Guess Your Neighbor’s Input: A Multipartite Nonlocal Game with No Quantum Advantage.” Physical Review Letters 104, 230404 (2010). DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.230404 Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img In their study, Mafalda Almeida from the ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques in Barcelona and coauthors found that classical and quantum correlations performed equally in a game called “Guess Your Neighbor’s Input.” The game involves a group of players in a ring who each receive an input number of either 0 or 1. The point of the game is that each player tries to guess the number of the person to their right. Of course, players are not allowed to know any information about their neighbor’s numbers before guessing, nor to communicate after having received their numbers. In order to win the game, players are allowed to share physical resources, such as classical or quantum correlations. Importantly, all these resources must be “no-signaling”; that is, they cannot enable instantaneous communication.The no-signaling principle is fundamental for physicists dealing with the concept of nonlocality. In nonlocality, one object can influence another object at a distance, such as through entanglement. However, this phenomenon cannot be used to send information faster than light, which prevents a direct conflict with Einstein’s theory of relativity. Nonlocal correlations, which physicists define as those violating a Bell inequality, are important because they serve as a key resource for quantum information processing.However, in the game in this study, the researchers found that players gained no advantage at guessing the correct numbers by using quantum resources compared to classical ones. This makes sense, since it seems that players should require signaling in order to improve their guessing accuracy, and neither quantum nor classical correlations involve signaling.Yet when the physicists looked at what happened when the players use no-signaling correlations (that is, correlations that satisfy the no-signaling principle) that are even stronger than those allowed in quantum mechanics (i.e. they had a higher degree of violation of a Bell inequality), they did find a surprise. No-signaling correlations could actually outperform the quantum and classical correlations, suggesting that quantum correlations obey a stronger version of the no-signaling principle.“Our study highlights a fundamental difference between quantum correlations and certain post-quantum correlations (that is, correlations stronger than those allowed in quantum mechanics, but which nevertheless obey the no-signaling principle),” Nicolas Brunner, coauthor and a physicist at the University of Bristol, told PhysOrg.com. “This is significant because it strongly indicates that quantum correlations could obey a stronger version of the no-signaling principle.”This game is the first that involves entanglement among more than two bits (called “multipartite entanglement”) to identify some of the boundary (or gap) between quantum correlations and the stronger no-signaling correlations. However, the results also raise further questions, such as what kind of physical principle might limit quantum non-local correlations? Why do (theoretical) post-quantum correlations seem to not exist in nature? And if they did exist, could these correlations be used for other information tasks? Right now, these questions are likely a long way from being answered. Citation: Quantum guessing game reveals insight into stronger-than-quantum correlations (2010, June 22) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-quantum-game-reveals-insight-stronger-than-quantum.html Explore furtherlast_img read more