Youth Urged To Prepare For Global Labour Market

first_imgYouth Urged To Prepare For Global Labour Market CultureNovember 28, 2014Written by: Chris Patterson Story HighlightsMinister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, is urging Jamaica’s youth to prepare to compete in a changing global labor market, and also create their own opportunities for employment.Ms. Hanna was addressing scores of young people on November 28, at a session held at the Jamaica Pegasus in New Kingston.She noted that large countries such as China and India are capitalizing on the creativity and ingenuity of its people by filling the needs for skilled persons globally. Youth Urged To Prepare For Global Labour MarketJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Minister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, is urging Jamaica’s youth to prepare to compete in a changing global labor market, and also create their own opportunities for employment.“By 2030, the International Labour Organization (ILO) says we are going to have to create 500 million new jobs…to be able to satisfy the labour demands of young people. Now that puts you in a very good place; you can create the type of opportunities right here in Jamaica that will make you globally competitive,” she said.Ms. Hanna was addressing scores of young people on November 28, at a session held at the Jamaica Pegasus in New Kingston.She noted that large countries such as China and India are capitalizing on the creativity and ingenuity of its people by filling the needs for skilled persons globally. For example, she said, China leads in terms of manufacturing of products and India as it relates to intellectual services and information communication technologies (ICT).Ms. Hanna urged Jamaicans to identify internationally competitive markets so that “we are able to create industries like China and India, to be able to compete.She also encouraged them to think carefully about the professions they want to enter and to make sure they choose careers that are profitable and adaptable.“It doesn’t make sense you go to school and you study and then when you can’t find a job in that particular industry in Jamaica, that you blame the Government and some other factor why you can’t get a job,” she said, noting that the top ten in demand jobs in 2013, did not exist in 2003.The session formed part of activities for Youth Month, which is celebrated in November. It was intended to provide a space and opportunity for young people, who have a keen interest in entrepreneurship, social enterprise and business development to acquire first hand information from some of Jamaica’s key leaders in business.Other outcomes of the initiative include: the sharing of best practices that can effectively impact Youth Business Development initiatives; facilitate a greater understanding of central terms and business development methodologies amongst participants; and develop a database of youth business development initiatives in order to provide practical referrals and support base for youth.Other speakers at the function include: Vice Chairman, Restaurant Associates Limited, Richard Lake; Executive Director, Jamaica Money Market Brokers Limited, Donna Duncan Scott; Manager, Treasury, Scotia Bank Jamaica; and Chief Executive Officer, ITEL BTO Solutions, Yoni Epstein. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail RelatedCDA to Host Bless the Children Concertcenter_img RelatedCountry’s Participation in Memory of the World Programme to be Strengthened RelatedNational Child Month Committee Hosts Parenting Forum Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Youth and Culture, Hon. Lisa Hanna, addresses scores of young people at a rap session held at the Jamaica Pegasus in New Kingston November 28. The session formed part of activities for Youth Month, which is celebrated in November. Advertisementslast_img read more

St Mike’s to offer graduate certificate in Public Health Equity

first_imgSaint Michael’s College,Vermont Business Magazine The current pandemic and racial tensions have shed light once again on the inequities that exist in society, especially within our healthcare system. In an effort to help solve these healthcare inequities, Saint Michael’s College has launched an online Health Equity Graduate Certificate program.The program takes aim at one of greatest challenges facing the United States and world by providing community members, professionals and college graduates with the skills needed to tackle topics such as the health implications of race-based systems of inequity; linkages between poverty and opportunity to live a healthy life; and the challenges of rural health.“Health equity isn’t just a disadvantage for some people,” says Professor Patricia Siplon, head of the public health program at Saint Michael’s College. “Health inequity destroys everyone’s well-being. It impacts employers, employees, and the entire health system. This program will hopefully help train a new generation of people who understand the enormity of this societal heath issue and are motivated to change it.”Participants in the St. Mike’s program can take five foundational content-packed courses ranging from Applied Epidemiology and Social Determinants of Health to Global Health Equity and Advocacy.  Participants must also earn three Applied Health Equity credits.  They can receive these credits by either taking workshops on topics like COVID-19 testing or emergency management or participating in a supervised research project.According to Siplon, one of the things she is most excited about with this program is the approach they are taking. “This program is consistent with Saint Michael’s College’s social justice mission and leverages the strengths of our faculty to take a more wholistic approach to the topic. We’re teaching our students to look at this from a global perspective, not just a local one.”St. Mike’s also has taken steps to complement regional public health master’s programs by creating agreements with the University of Vermont and Boston University to allow a certificate holder an easy entry with transferable credits to their programs.“Ours is the only health equity program in Vermont.  With health equity being a central strategic principle of the Vermont Department of Health, we’re filling a critical need. There is a dramatic increase in demand for individuals with health equity skills in medical and community settings,” says Siplon.To learn more about the Health Equity Graduate Certificate program, click here(link is external).About Saint Michael’s CollegeSaint Michael’s College, founded in the great Catholic intellectual tradition, which also recognizes the principles of social justice and compassion, is a selective, fully residential Catholic college in Vermont’s beautiful Green Mountains. Our closely connected community delivers internationally-respected liberal arts and graduate education near Burlington, one of the country’s best college towns. To prepare for fulfilling careers and meaningful lives, young adults here grow intellectually, socially, and morally, learning to be responsible for themselves, each other and their world.Source: COLCHESTER, VT — Saint Michael’s College 7.27.2020last_img read more